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I have a very simple class that holds a few public properties – ID, Text, Colour, etc. and a Boolean called 'SelectedItem'. Just like the Checked property on RadioButtons, only one item can have its SelectedItem property set to True within a particular group. Note: there will be several separate groups (lists), each allowed to have only one item with SelectedItem = True.

My first thought was that I would probably just have to handle everything outside of the class, setting SelectedItem to False for every other item in a particular list when another item was selected. But that seems rather inelegant to me. So I've been trying to think of how this might be done within the class. For example: could I perhaps have a private string property called say "GroupName" – set in the New sub when adding a new instance of the class – and then use a private shared method to set every item's SelectedItem property to False, provided the item has the same GroupName as the newly selected item? I would have a go at doing this but I have no idea how to enumerate every instance of a class from within that class, or whether that's even possible. Is it? Or is there another (better) way to achieve my goal?


EDIT

Thanks for all the suggestions and comments, they're all very much appreciated.

On the back of comments by Tim and Cyborgx37 I've decided to follow their advise and use a CollectionBase as an item manager class. Here is a cut-down version of what I've got so far:

Public Class ResourceItem
    Public ID As Integer
    Public Text As String
    Public SelectedItem As Boolean
End Class

Public Class ResourceItemsManager
    Inherits System.Collections.CollectionBase

    Public Sub Add(ByVal iID As Integer, ByVal sText As String)
        Dim newResItem As New ResourceItem
        With newResItem
            .ID = iID
            .Text = sText
        End With
        List.Add(newResItem)
    End Sub

    Default Public ReadOnly Property Item(ByVal Index As Integer) As ResourceItem
        Get
            If Index < Count And Index >= 0 Then
                Return CType(List.Item(Index), ResourceItem)
            Else
                Return Nothing
            End If
        End Get
    End Property

    Public Sub ClearAll()
        List.Clear()
    End Sub

    Public Sub SelectItem(ByVal Index As Integer)
        If Index < Count And Index >= 0 Then
            For i As Integer = 0 To List.Count - 1
                List.Item(i).SelectedItem = i = Index
            Next
        Else
            'Exception code here
        End If
    End Sub
End Class

As can be seen: instead of instantiating a new ResourceItem and passing that as an argument to the manager's Add procedure, I'm simply passing the details of the new item and the procedure is creating the item from those. I don't know whether this is a good or bad idea – please advise – but I've done it because I couldn't figure out how to make the SelectedItem property only writeable by the manager, so I wanted to avoid having directly accessible objects that could have their SelectedItem property set to True without it deselecting all the other items in the same group. Of course that still leaves the possibility of setting a variable to one of the manager's list items and setting it from there, so I would still like to know how I could prevent that, if possible.


UPDATE
I didn't use the code above in the end, deciding instead to go with Cyborgx37's solution – which seems to work perfectly well for me despite the warnings about best practice. I also realised I would need to use the same class in another scenario where multiple items could be selected, so it was easy to add a Boolean property to the manager to enable that.

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2  
You could create a collection-class inheriting from CollectionBase for your custom type. Then you can ensure that only one of the same group is checked. –  Tim Schmelter Jun 1 '12 at 15:43
3  
To enumerate you need some sort of container class that knows about them all. There's a few ways of doing that, but at some point they all get down to foreach(thing in thingies) and it's that reference to thingies you need to decide on –  Tony Hopkinson Jun 1 '12 at 15:55
    
@TimSchmelter I'm still a bit green with .NET so it took me a bit of getting my head around. I've gone through this MS walkthrough: Creating Your Own Collection Class and I think I'm doing what you suggest – it seems to work anyhow. I've added a method called 'SelectItem' to the collection class, and I'm using that to enumerate every item in the group and set their checked state appropriately. Is that what you had in mind? If so, is there a way I could make the SelectedItem property read-only except to the collection class? –  Antagony Jun 1 '12 at 18:23
    
You can change the access modifier of a property at the get and set blocks. Public Property MyProp As Object Get Return Nothing End Get Protected Set(value As Object) End Set End Property –  ulty4life Jun 1 '12 at 18:28
    
You could also just make the SelectedItem property ReadOnly, and the class can just access the private variable that the property exposes. You can't use shorthand properties for either of these approaches. Shorthand property syntax only has one access modifier and always contains a get and set. –  ulty4life Jun 1 '12 at 18:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is an extremely simple solution. It doesn't follow every best practice (for example, exposing the Items collection in the ItemManager is probably a bad idea), but it demonstrates the idea of a central manager and properties in the individual items which interface with the manager.

Module Module1

Sub Main()

    Dim l_itemManager As New ItemsManager()

    Dim l_item1 As New Item(l_itemManager) With {.Description = "Item 1"}
    Dim l_item2 As New Item(l_itemManager) With {.Description = "Item 2"}
    Dim l_item3 As New Item(l_itemManager) With {.Description = "Item 3"}
    Dim l_item4 As New Item(l_itemManager) With {.Description = "Item 4"}

    l_itemManager.SelectedItem = l_item1

    Console.WriteLine("Item 1 = " & If(l_item1.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("Item 2 = " & If(l_item2.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("Item 3 = " & If(l_item3.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("Item 4 = " & If(l_item4.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("")

    l_itemManager.SelectedItem = l_item2

    Console.WriteLine("Item 1 = " & If(l_item1.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("Item 2 = " & If(l_item2.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("Item 3 = " & If(l_item3.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("Item 4 = " & If(l_item4.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("")

    l_item3.IsSelected = True

    Console.WriteLine("Item 1 = " & If(l_item1.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("Item 2 = " & If(l_item2.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("Item 3 = " & If(l_item3.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("Item 4 = " & If(l_item4.IsSelected, "Selected", "Unselected"))
    Console.WriteLine("")

    Console.WriteLine("Press any key...")
    Console.ReadKey(True)

End Sub

Class ItemsManager

    Public Event SelectedItemChanged As EventHandler

    Public Items As New List(Of Item)

    Private _item As Item
    Public Property SelectedItem() As Item
        Get
            Return _item
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As Item)
            _item = value
            RaiseEvent SelectedItemChanged(sender:=Me, e:=EventArgs.Empty)
        End Set
    End Property

End Class

Class Item

    Public Event IsSelectedChanged As EventHandler

    Private WithEvents _manager As ItemsManager
    Public ReadOnly Property Manager() As ItemsManager
        Get
            Return _manager
        End Get
    End Property

    Private _description As String
    Public Property Description() As String
        Get
            Return _description
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As String)
            _description = value
        End Set
    End Property

    Public Property IsSelected() As Boolean
        Get
            Return Me.Manager.SelectedItem Is Me
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As Boolean)
            If value Then
                Me.Manager.SelectedItem = Me
            Else
                Me.Manager.SelectedItem = Nothing
            End If
        End Set
    End Property

    Public Sub New(ByVal manager As ItemsManager)
        _manager = manager
        Me.Manager.Items.Add(Me)
    End Sub

    Private Sub _manager_SelectedItemChanged(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles _manager.SelectedItemChanged
        RaiseEvent IsSelectedChanged(sender:=Me, e:=EventArgs.Empty)
    End Sub

End Class

End Module

EDIT:

While not perfectly inline with best practices, this code will work. Best practices are highly dependent on context, so it's hard to say what the "right" approach would be without knowing the specifics of your application. That said, the general concept of a manager and child classes (where the child classes are calling into the manager to get their state) should work in nearly all circumstances.

I agree with @TimSchmelter, CollectionBase is going to give you the most power. But you may not need that much power for your purposes. And you'd still end up having to use code similar to what I've posted - where the children will ask the parent for their status.

NOTE: I corrected a small bug in the code above. Setting a selected item to not selected would have resulted in nothing happening. I've changed this behavior to make the SelectedItem Nothing.

share|improve this answer
    
Well that certainly works but you've made me nervous with your comments about it not being best practice. As I've just mentioned to Tim in a reply to his OP comment: I'm still a bit green with .NET, so I don't really want to be using bad methods if I can avoid it. –  Antagony Jun 1 '12 at 18:47
    
The problem as I see it – with both this and Tim's suggestion – is I don't see how it's giving me a great deal of advantage over simply creating a procedure to deselect every item in a given list and passing the list as an argument. I'm probably expecting too much, but I was rather hoping for a solution that's a bit more self-contained – i.e. I would prefer to set any item's SelectedItem property and have that automatically deselect the other items, than have to use a method of a container/manager class. –  Antagony Jun 1 '12 at 19:22
1  
@Antagony: By using a custom class inheriting from CollectionBase, you have full control over your items. The benefits are reusability and most of all encapsulation. Of course you have to implement the functionality largely yourself, but it's the right way. –  Tim Schmelter Jun 1 '12 at 19:37
    
@TimSchmelter Please show an example. The challenge is still going to be the that the check event is on the item not the collection and the item itself has no knowledge of the collection. –  Blam Jun 1 '12 at 20:13
    
Thanks for the explanatory update. I've decided to go with the CollectionBase Tim suggested – please see my OP edit – and your code and comments have helped me to understand the manager/child class relationship. Thanks also to @TimSchmelter for putting me on the right track. –  Antagony Jun 2 '12 at 10:46

Pass the collection to the class in ctor and iterate the list there.

   List<People> peoples = new List<people>();
   peoples.add(new People("Group1", peoples));
   peoples.add(new People("Group1", peoples));
   peoples.add(new People("Group1", peoples));


   Pubic Class People, iNotifyPropertyChanged
   {
      private List<People> peoples;
      private bool isChecked = false;

      public book IsChecked 
      { 
          get { return isChecked; }
          set 
          {
              if(isChecked = value) return;
              isChecked = value;
              if (isChecked)
              {
                  foreach (person p in peoples)
                  {
                      if (p.Ischecked && p != this)  p.Uncheck();
                  }
              }
          }
      }
      public void Uncheck
      {
          isChecked = false;
          NotifyPropertyChanged("IsChecked");
      }

      public People(string group, List<People> _peoples { peoples = _peoples; };
   }
share|improve this answer
    
I believe Antagony is looking for a POCO, not a control. –  JDB Jun 1 '12 at 20:44
    
@Cyborgx37 see the Or. Did you vote me down for that? –  Blam Jun 1 '12 at 20:59
    
I did not vote you down. –  JDB Jun 2 '12 at 0:31
    
@Cyborgx37 cool –  Blam Jun 2 '12 at 2:34
    
Sorry, it's not WPF and I'm afraid I don't really understand your C# code. My use of the word 'list' may have been a bit misleading too. I explained in an earlier comment to another answer that I meant List(Of T) and that the class is not a control, but that answer has been pulled so my comment disappeared with it. –  Antagony Jun 2 '12 at 10:47

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