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Is there any LINQ-like project for Python that can automatically query XML files and/or RDBMS tables? The syntax does not have to be exactly like LINQ in C#, but hopefully close in a pythonic way.

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Note that, there is pyquery, a jquery-syntax/capabilities like package for Python. –  user712092 Aug 30 '11 at 16:27
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9 Answers 9

Pynq implements expression trees:

http://wiki.github.com/heynemann/pynq

Microsoft created Linq (Language Integrated Query) using Expression trees, which is a math concept on how to parse operations into trees in a way that you can analyze the operations independently from the result.

Pynq is an implementation in Python of the Expression Tree theory and some of the providers. There will be more providers gradually, but Pynq will strive to make it as easy as possible to write your own provider.

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Should be checked... –  BenDundee Feb 7 '13 at 22:03
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According to this article Python doesn't need the equivalent of LINQ, it already has it:

http://sayspy.blogspot.com.au/2006/02/why-python-doesnt-need-something-like.html

Also see this:

http://www.codebadger.com/blog/post/2009/06/01/Pythone28099s-LINQ-Equivalents-e28093-filter()-map()-and-list-comprehension.aspx

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The thing people seem to miss is yeah LINQ can work on iterables like python list comprehensions. But the power of LINQ is the ability to convert the entire expression into an expression tree. Then you can do things like transform the tree, compile it to CIL, convert it to sql and execute it on a remote database, etc. You can't do that with generator expressions in python. –  Eloff Mar 24 '13 at 21:03
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I haven't used it yet, but this shows promise:

asq is a simple implementation of a LINQ-inspired API for Python which operates over Python iterables, including a parallel version implemented in terms of the Python standard library multiprocessing module. The API sports feature equivalence with LINQ for objects, 100% statement test coverage and comprehensive documentation.

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If you are looking for an ORM then there is SQLAlchemy

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Elixir, which is a declarative layer on top of the SQLAlchemy, is easy and convenient to use. elixir.ematia.de –  sunqiang Jul 6 '09 at 4:26
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I don't know much about Linq but you may be interested in this:

http://code.activestate.com/recipes/442447/

It allows using generator expressions to query an SQL database.

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I'm not an expert, but the Dejavu people claims Dejavu makes much of what LINQ does, and did it way before LINQ. Could be worth checking out:

http://us.pycon.org/2009/conference/schedule/event/70/

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I think Pony ORM should be mentioned here. To me, this is LINQ:

q = select((p.name, p.price) for p in Product) 
q2 = q.filter(lambda n, p: n.name.startswith(“A”) and p > 100)

or straight from their landing page:

select(c for c in Customer
         if sum(c.orders.price) > 1000)
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You may want to look at kalamar: http://dyko.org/api/kalamar.html

It is a unified data access library using a syntax more or less similar to linq for accessing data stored in different format (xml, mp3, ...) on heterogeneous backend (files, sql, ...).

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If you're looking for cross-language LINQ, the place it's happening is in the Reactive Extensions which Microsoft is implementing in Python, Ruby, javascript, etc. That requires LINQ, so they usually end up implementing the Linq operators first ;)

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