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The problem is the SimpleDateFormat seems to be adding 17 hours to the actual timestamp.

This should be something really simple. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong. I have a method that will convert a long of nanoseconds to a formatted timestamp. It's adding 17 hours. Here's my SSCCE

package playground;

import java.sql.Timestamp;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

/**
*
* @author kentcdodds
*/
public class NanosecondsToString {

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    long nanoseconds = 234236402;
    Timestamp ts = new Timestamp(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.convert(nanoseconds, TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS));
    SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss:SSS");
    String formatted = format.format(ts);
    System.out.println(formatted);
  }
}

The output: 17:00:00:234

I'm in Mountain Standard Time

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Is it doing some timezone calucation for you? Where are you in relation to GMT? –  jonnyGold Jun 1 '12 at 15:58
    
I'm in Mountain Standard Time –  kentcdodds Jun 1 '12 at 16:01
1  
While your SSCCE is much better than most, is it really a SSCCE without import statements? Not everyone fires up an IDE for short problems. –  Edwin Buck Jun 1 '12 at 16:33
    
@EdwinBuck Good point. I'll fix it. –  kentcdodds Jun 1 '12 at 16:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have to set the timezone to UTC.

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
              long nanoseconds = 234236402;
              Timestamp ts = new Timestamp(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.convert(nanoseconds, TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS));
              SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss:SSS");
              format.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
              String formatted = format.format(ts);
              System.out.println(formatted);
    }

SimpleDateFormat will convert the timestamp to a time in your current time zone by default. So it is necessary to tell it to assume it as UTC. Otherwise, you can use jodatime's interval class.

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That did it. Thanks! –  kentcdodds Jun 1 '12 at 16:02

What timezone is your machine in? Is it possibly doing a timezone conversion?

If so using the Java TimeZone class may be helpful: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/TimeZone.html

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In formatting with SimpleDateFormat, you are implicitly converting a duration into a date. To format that date semi-safely do the formatting in the GMT timezone, without DST. This will still have problems when encountering +24 hour durations.

A better solution is to code up a Duration class, and a SimpleDurationFormat class. It is a pain, but you only need to do this once. Alternatives exist too, like sucking in JodaTime, which has explicit support for Durations (although I never had to format one).

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