Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Wondering if there's any guidelines that should be followed when writing an application that should work not only on a plain ol' non-networked computer but also on a computer/network that is setup with Active Directory (or some other directory service) and/or Terminal Services? Anything I should look out for, be aware of, etc?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Microsoft has renamed Terminal Services to 'Remote Desktop Services' so searching and looking around MSDN my not be as constructive using the old terminology. I'd start having a look around Remote Desktop Services Programming Guidelines found here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa383490(VS.85).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like some good stuff, thanks for pointing those resources out. –  ZZZzzz Jul 8 '09 at 17:10
add comment

On the AD site a starting point would be here:

[http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms682458(VS.85).aspx][2]

share|improve this answer
add comment

The most important things to be aware of: On a Terminal Server users are not admins, they have no rights to:

  • Write in Program files folder
  • Register ActiveX controls
  • Write into (ini files) in Windows(\System32)
  • HKLM hive of the registry

Some other points: - Certain API's like getting the Windows directory will return redirected results (in this case the windows subfolder of the homedrive) UNLESS you mark your executable as Terminal Server aware - Your application must not rely on settings in HKCU that prevent startup when not present - Multiple users might use your app concurrently so each user must be able to have their own settings (in HKCU)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.