Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've cloned a git submodule of one of my libraries into a project I'm working on. The thing is that, after cloning, I need to change some lines in the cloned submodule, but I don't want to push those changes into the original repository.

I want those changes to stay in the superproject. Is this possible? How can I achieve that?

EDIT: As @GoZoner said, basically its:

  1. git clone foo;
  2. cd foo;
  3. git submodule init;
  4. git submodule update;
  5. cd path/to/submodule;
  6. git checkout master;
  7. Make changes to the submodule
  8. git commit -am "Something";
  9. git push origin (the superproject);

Then when I clone the superproject in another computer (up to step 4), I want those changes to be saved, in the superproject.

share|improve this question
    
When you say 'I want those changes to stay in the superproject' you mean: when somebody does "git clone <superproject> foo; cd foo; git submodule init; git submodule update" they should have a working directory that includes my changes to the cloned submodule? –  GoZoner Jun 2 '12 at 10:11
    
@GoZoner Yes - but the changes in the submodule shouldn't be pushed to its original repository. I'll restructure the question with your comment. –  AeroCross Jun 3 '12 at 16:21
    
Right, that is what I thought you were asking and I don't think it is possible. Git marks the directory containing the submodule specially and won't look beyond that directory for 'local' changes. –  GoZoner Jun 3 '12 at 16:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you need to relax the 'no commit to submodule' constraint. There are two options:

  1. Commit your submodule changes to a submodule branch. It is your team's branch and it is where your team put your submodule changes. When somebody clones the super project and updates the submodule they get the content of your team's branch.
  2. Clone the submodule repository 'right next to' your super project repository and initialize the submodule to point to your clone. Then when you commit changes to the submodule they are committed to your clone. Anybody who clones the super project gets submodule content from your submodule clone.

Otherwise, I don't see a way to achieve your desire.

share|improve this answer
1  
These are actually nice alternatives. I can't achieve what I actually want to do, but these are viable choices. What I want to do with those files is to change paths, which is basic, but still is good to know what to do in certain cases. I think I might be able to use option 2 and some difftools in the future. Thanks! –  AeroCross Jun 5 '12 at 12:32

You can checkout a separate branch for your changes. Don't push that branch up. Changes that you do want to push, make that on one of the original branches. Merge that branch into your special branch that you don't push up. Don't do any other work on your special branch as you would then have to merge the other way. You can do that but it gets complicated.

share|improve this answer
    
If I checkout a different branch that I won't push to the original branch, then commit there, the reference will be missing when I clone the repo and init the submodule. That's what I tried before posting. A missing reference error will appear and I'd be back to square 1,unless I'm missing something. –  AeroCross Jun 2 '12 at 15:32
    
You have to update your question with the exact structure. Sorry. –  Adam Dymitruk Jun 2 '12 at 18:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.