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Would just like too see what peoples Stored Procedure/Function etc comment headers look like (so post your examples)...I've only really seen what the SQL Server Management Studio creates but am interested in what other peoples look like...the formatting, characters used, procedure information/details etc I guess are what really makes them different...

sorry if this question doesn't make sense...thanks heaps!

SQL Server Management Studio (version 9) stored procedure comment header default:

-- =============================================
-- Author:  	Name
-- Create date: 
-- Description: 
-- =============================================
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1  
Never use Line comments (--), use block comments (/* */) if you have a problem with line formatting you'll be on comments hell. –  Gabriel Guimarães Mar 30 '11 at 12:44
    
Could you please elaborate on that @GabrielGuimarães? I have a lot of scripts with line comments and wasn't aware of this before: what should I look out for? –  Robert Mark Bram Aug 23 '12 at 3:19
    
@GabrielGuimarães Management Studio has a function caleld "Comment out the selected lines" that prepends a line comment to all selected lines. The inverse function "Uncomment the selected lines" removes the leading line comment from all selected lines. Works well enough for me. What line-formatting problems do you have? –  Iain Elder Feb 26 '13 at 14:37
    
if on Old SQL Boxes you use the procedure sp_helptext to get the script of the procedure the lines are not breaked, and for that reason the result is a single line, there so you have no way to know where the comment should end. –  Gabriel Guimarães Mar 8 '13 at 15:48

9 Answers 9

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Can I point out that all these "change history" and "modified date" fields can and should be obtained from your version control software, rather than being embedded in the code by the programmer. This is a lessson that C (for example) programmers learned long ago.

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1  
any best practices on this? –  lstanczyk Sep 7 '11 at 17:05
    
I didn't see many companies that use source control with stored procedures wisely. –  Hagai L May 23 '12 at 11:44
1  
Can you explain the reason that C programmers learned this lesson? I believe you should put them in both the header of your source and your source control comment when you commit. Saves time over the long haul not having to jump between your file and source control system to see a basic description and if you ever switch source control systems at least you have it in the source that will stay constant. You can argue that now you have meta data in two places,but if a developer can't handle copy a date a brief description between two locations closely tied to each other fire them. –  Bob Jan 24 '13 at 15:24
    
I see your talking change history I see only keeping the last change comment and not a long running one. I have seen stored procs that span 10 years and the history length is obnoxious at best. So I do see where your coming from. –  Bob Jan 24 '13 at 15:28

we use somthing like this and very use ful for me

/*
Description:
Author:
Create Date: Param:
Return:
Modified Date:
Modification:
*/

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-- [why did we write this?]
-- [auto-generated change control info]
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Exactly. Documenting why is so much more worthwhile than what. Although as a beginner, I would prefer why, what as well as how. :) –  Thor Hovden Sep 29 '11 at 7:56
/******************************
** File:    
** Name:
** Desc:
** Auth:
** Date:
**************************
** Change History
**************************
** PR   Date	    Author  Description	
** --   --------   -------   ------------------------------------
** 1    01/10/2008      Dan      added  inner join
*******************************/
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2  
when we add a new code to the stored procedure we add at the end of it a reference to the top. for example : select * from Boxes inner join Colors on Boxes.colorID=Colors.ID --PR#1 –  Hagai L Jul 6 '09 at 9:50
2  
That reminds me of the time we made the collective decision to remove all comments like "--PR#1" at the end of lines wherever we came across them. They never served any purpose. Forensic analysis of a change, in the rare instances when needed, was much easier using the change control software. –  Jeffrey Kemp Jul 6 '09 at 13:46
    
+1 for Block Comments, and change log –  Gabriel Guimarães Mar 30 '11 at 12:45
--
-- STORED PROCEDURE
--     Name of stored procedure.
--
-- DESCRIPTION
--     Business description of the stored procedure's functionality.
--
-- PARAMETERS
--     @InputParameter1
--         * Description of @InputParameter1 and how it is used.
--
-- RETURN VALUE
--         0 - No Error.
--     -1000 - Description of cause of non-zero return value.
--
-- PROGRAMMING NOTES
--     Gotchas and other notes for your fellow programmer.
--
-- CHANGE HISTORY
--     05 May 2009 - Who
--        * More comprehensive description of the change than that included with the
--          source code commit message.
--
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-- Author: 
--
-- Original creation date: 
--
-- Description: 
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See if this suits your requirement:

/*

  • Notes on parameters: Give the details of all parameters supplied to the proc

  • This procedure will perform the following tasks: Give details description of the intent of the proc

  • Additional notes: Give information of something that you think needs additional mention, though is not directly related to the proc

  • Modification History: 07/11/2001 ACL TICKET/BUGID CHANGE DESCRIPTION

*/

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The header that we currently use looks like this:

---------------------------------------------------
-- Produced By   : Our company  
-- URL       : www.company.com 	
-- Author        : me	
-- Date      : yesterday 	
-- Purpose       : to do something	
-- Called by     : some other process   
-- Modifications : some other guy - today - to fix my bug   
------------------------------------------------------------

On a side note, any comments that I place within the SQL i always use the format:

/* Comment */

As in the past I had problems where scripting (by SQL Server) does funny things wrapping lines round and comments starting -- have commented out required SQL.... but that might just be me.

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2  
"Date : yesterday" LOL –  Jeffrey Kemp Sep 29 '11 at 9:07
set timing on <br>
set linesize 180<br>
spool template.log

/*<br>
##########################################################################<br>
-- Name : Template.sql<br>
-- Date             : (sysdate) <br>
-- Author           :   Duncan van der Zalm - dvdzalm<br>
-- Company          :   stanDaarD-Z.nl<br>
-- Purpose          :   <br>
-- Usage        sqlplus <br>
-- Impact   :<br>
-- Required grants  :   sel on A, upd on B, drop on C<br>
-- Called by        :   some other process<br
##########################################################################<br>
-- ver  user    date        change  <br>
-- 1.0  DDZ 20110622    initial<br>
##########################################################################<br>
*/<br>

sho user<br>

select name from v$database;

select to_char(sysdate, 'Day DD Month yyyy HH24:MI:SS') "Start time"
from dual
;


-- script


select to_char(sysdate, 'Day DD Month yyyy HH24:MI:SS') "End time"
from dual
;

spool off
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