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I want to force a repaint during a Javascript loop. For example:

var s = document.getElementById("foo");
for (var i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
    s.innerText = i + " times";

That updates at the end, but I would like to observe each intermediate step. The common response to this problem is to use setTimeout, however, there are three reasons that is unacceptable:

  • There are other buttons/links etc on the page, and it is important that none of these can be clicked while the loop operates.
  • At the end of the loop I want to display a popup, if the timeout fires then standard popup blockers will hide it, as it is no longer initiated by the user.
  • If the user clicks while the loop is running, I want that click to be buffered until the loop completes, not fired half way through the loop.

Is there a way to force the browser to repaint?

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> At the end of the loop I want to display a popup, if the timeout fires then standard popup blockers will hide it, as it is no longer initiated by the user. I'm not quite sure of this. I'm never using settimeout to window.open popups but almost each time the browser stops the popup –  Sebas Jun 1 '12 at 20:22
    
If the popup is opened in direct response to a user action (i.e. a click) then it's usually allowed. If you start it in response to something else, then often disallowed. –  Neil Mitchell Jun 1 '12 at 20:24
3  
"Is there a way to force the browser to repaint?" I don't believe so. Your first and third issues with setTimeout would seem to be solvable. Not sure about the second. –  squint Jun 1 '12 at 20:26
    
ltdr; this is not possible. –  user166390 Jun 1 '12 at 20:27
    
@amnotiam The first I can see a solution to (it's in my control), the third isn't really solvable - I'd have to capture and "replay" all clicks etc. –  Neil Mitchell Jun 1 '12 at 20:30
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm afraid this is your only solution though, since the non-repaintable-in-the-middle is something important as a predicate for speed gains in rendering of browsers.

Perhaps could you manage a buffer-me flag in those click events you don't want to fire? Or better said a dont-buffer-me flag...

I hope it helped, best regards.

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