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Vector methods are synchronized. What does it mean programmatically and logically?

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8  
    
helpful discussion between hashmap and hashtable, and synchronization: stackoverflow.com/questions/40471/java-hashmap-vs-hashtable –  limc Jan 22 '11 at 18:42
    
This question get more votes than the answer. Does it mean more people still been puzzled with synchronized ? :) –  Azi Aug 21 at 10:40

11 Answers 11

up vote 124 down vote accepted

The synchronized keyword is all about different threads reading and writing to the same variables, objects and resources. This is not a trivial topic in Java, but here is a quote from Sun:

Synchronized methods enable a simple strategy for preventing thread interference and memory consistency errors: if an object is visible to more than one thread, all reads or writes to that object's variables are done through synchronized methods.

In a very, very small nutshell: When you have two threads that are reading and writing to the same 'resource', say a variable named foo, you need to ensure that these threads access the variable in an atomic way. Without the synchronized keyword, your thread 1 may not see the change thread 2 made to foo, or worse, it may only be half changed. This would not be what you logically expect.

Again, this is a non-trivial topic in Java. To learn more, explore topics here on SO and the Interwebs about:

Keep exploring these topics until the name "Brian Goetz" becomes permanently associated with the term "concurrency" in your brain.

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5  
So, basically this Synchronized keyword makes your methods thread-safe? –  Rigo Vides Jul 6 '09 at 7:12
11  
The synchronized keyword is one of the tools that make your code thread safe. Just using synchronized on a method or variable in itself may or may not do the trick. Having a basic understanding of the Java Memory Model is really important to getting concurrency correct. –  Stu Thompson Jul 6 '09 at 7:14
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Unless you are Brian Goetz (or maybe Jon Skeet), it is almost impossible to get Java concurrency correct with only the language primitives (synchronized, volatile). For starters, make use of the java.util.concurrent package and build on top of that. –  Thilo Jul 6 '09 at 7:30
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Some of us did code (presumably) thread-safe code with Java 1.4, thank you very much ;-). –  Robert Munteanu Jul 6 '09 at 7:42
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yes, presumably... :) –  Hans Westerbeek Oct 1 '12 at 9:32

The "Synchronized" keywords prevents concurrent access to a block of code or object by multiple Threads. By default, a Hashtable is synchronized, so only one thread can access the table at a time. For a HashMap, if you want to prevent thread-safety issues you must manually account for this in your coding.

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thank you, this is a clear explanation. –  Josh Morrison Jan 22 '11 at 18:46
    
@Andy - You are welcome. Thank you. –  jmort253 Jan 22 '11 at 18:55

Synchronised means that in a multiple threaded environment, a synchronised object does not let two threads access a the same time. This means that one thread can't be reading while another updates it.

The second thread will instead wait until the first is done. The overhead is speed, but the advantage is guaranteed consistency of data.

If your application is single threaded though, synchronised has no benefit.

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great and concise, ty –  wired00 Aug 26 at 12:41

The synchronized keyword causes a thread to obtain a lock when entering the method, so that only one thread can execute the method at the same time (for the given object instance, unless it is a static method).

This is frequently called making the class thread-safe, but I would say this is a euphemism. While it is true that synchronization protects the internal state of the Vector from getting corrupted, this does not usually help the user of Vector much.

Consider this:

 if (vector.isEmpty()){
     vector.add(data);
 }

Even though the methods involved are synchronized, because they are being locked and unlocked individually, two unfortunately timed threads can create a vector with two elements.

So in effect, you have to synchronize in your application code as well.

Because method-level synchronization is a) expensive when you don't need it and b) insufficient when you need synchronization, there are now un-synchronized replacements (ArrayList in the case of Vector).

More recently, the concurrency package has been released, with a number of clever utilities that take care of multi-threading issues.

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Think of it as a kind of turnstile like you might find at a football ground. There are parallel steams of people wanting to get in but at the turnstile they are 'synchronised'. Only one person at a time can get through. All those wanting to get through will do, but they may have to wait until they can go through.

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Consider this code

public class SOP {
    public static void print(String s)
    {
        System.out.println(s+"\n");
    }
}

public class TestThread extends Thread
{
    String name;
    Synchronised synchronised;
    public TestThread(String name,Synchronised synchronised)
    {
        this.synchronised = synchronised;
        this.name = name;
        start();
    }

    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        synchronised.test(name);
    }
}

public class Synchronised {
    public synchronized void test(String name)
    {
        for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
        {
            SOP.print(name + " :: "+i);
            try{
                Thread.sleep(500);
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                SOP.print(e.getMessage());
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Synchronised synchronised = new Synchronised();
        new TestThread("THREAD 1",synchronised);
        new TestThread("THREAD 2",synchronised);
        new TestThread("THREAD 3",synchronised);
    }
}

Note: synchronized blocks the next thread's call to method test() as long as the previous thread's execution is not finished. Threads can access this method one at a time. Without synchronized all threads can access this method simultaneously.

Output with synchronised

THREAD 1 :: 0
THREAD 1 :: 1
THREAD 1 :: 2
THREAD 1 :: 3
THREAD 1 :: 4
THREAD 1 :: 5
THREAD 1 :: 6
THREAD 1 :: 7
THREAD 1 :: 8
THREAD 1 :: 9
THREAD 3 :: 0
THREAD 3 :: 1
THREAD 3 :: 2
THREAD 3 :: 3
THREAD 3 :: 4
THREAD 3 :: 5
THREAD 3 :: 6
THREAD 3 :: 7
THREAD 3 :: 8
THREAD 3 :: 9
THREAD 2 :: 0
THREAD 2 :: 1
THREAD 2 :: 2
THREAD 2 :: 3
THREAD 2 :: 4
THREAD 2 :: 5
THREAD 2 :: 6
THREAD 2 :: 7
THREAD 2 :: 8
THREAD 2 :: 9

Output without synchronized

THREAD 1 :: 0
THREAD 2 :: 0
THREAD 3 :: 0
THREAD 1 :: 1
THREAD 2 :: 1
THREAD 3 :: 1
THREAD 1 :: 2
THREAD 2 :: 2
THREAD 3 :: 2
THREAD 1 :: 3
THREAD 2 :: 3
THREAD 3 :: 3
THREAD 1 :: 4
THREAD 2 :: 4
THREAD 3 :: 4
THREAD 1 :: 5
THREAD 2 :: 5
THREAD 3 :: 5
THREAD 1 :: 6
THREAD 2 :: 6
THREAD 3 :: 6
THREAD 1 :: 7
THREAD 2 :: 7
THREAD 3 :: 7
THREAD 1 :: 8
THREAD 2 :: 8
THREAD 3 :: 8
THREAD 1 :: 9
THREAD 2 :: 9
THREAD 3 :: 9
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To my understanding synchronized basically means that the compiler write a monitor.enter and monitor.exit around your method. As such it may be thread safe depending on how it is used (what I mean is you can write an object with synchronized methods that isn't threadsafe depending on what your class does).

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This link has helped me to learn more about synchronized keyword, apart from locking and mutual exclusion. There are subtle details like different locks used to enter into synchronized method, depending upon, whether it's static or not.

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synchronized simple means no two threads can access the block/method simultaneously. When we say any block/method of a class is synchronized it means only one thread can access them at a time. Internally the thread which tries to access it first take a lock on that object and as long as this lock is not available no other thread can access any of the synchronized methods/blocks of that instance of the class.

Note another thread can access a method of the same object which is not defined to be synchronized. A thread can release the lock by calling

Object.wait()
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public synchronized void start() {
    var = true;
    thread.start();
}

Keyword thread. Basically, this allows not threads to overlap and stuff. So no problems will occur.

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4  
best SO answer ever –  symphonyblade Jul 3 at 21:49

synchronized is a keyword in Java which is used to make happens before relationship in multithreading environment to avoid memory inconsistency and thread interference error.

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