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A certain situation in Python recently alarmed me, and its reason is still not completely clear after a little research. The following class definitions appear to working flawlessly and will produce what is intended:

class A: __slots__ = 'a', 'b'
class B(A): __slots__ = ()
class C(A): __slots__ = ()
class D(B, C): __slots__ = ()

There are four classes arranged in a diamond inheritance pattern. However, a somewhat similar pattern is not allowed. The following class definitions seem as though they are functioning the same as the first:

class B: __slots__ = 'a', 'b'
class C: __slots__ = 'a', 'b'
class D(B, C): __slots__ = ()

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#74>", line 1, in <module>
    class D(B, C): __slots__ = ()
TypeError: multiple bases have instance lay-out conflict

However, a TypeError is raised in this example. So three questions arise: (1) Is this a bug in Python, considering the slot names? (2) What would justify such an answer? (3) What is the best workaround?


References:

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2  
I confess I'm not 100% understanding this either, but based on the sources you linked, it doesn't appear that it's a bug. As I said earlier, I'm not 100% on this, but the best "workaround" seems to be to limit the use of __slots__. Is there a specific reason you have to use them? –  Joel Cornett Jun 1 '12 at 21:42
2  
They are being automatically generated by a metaclass to store a magic instance attribute outside its dictionary. The system automatically runs a conversion on all base classes as well which leads to the multiple inheritance problem. –  Noctis Skytower Jun 4 '12 at 13:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

By forcing a constraint that no class defines __slots__, a special object class could be constructed with the characteristics desired for all child classes. The class is registered as an alias for regular objects.

class _object: __slots__ = '_MetaSafe__exec', '__dict__'

class MetaSafe(type):

    __REGISTRY = {object: _object}

    @classmethod
    def clone(cls, old):
        return cls(old.__name__, old.__bases__, dict(old.__dict__), old)

    def __new__(cls, name, bases, classdict, old=None):
        # Check on a few classdict keys.
        assert '__new__' not in classdict, '__new__ must not be defined!'
        assert '__slots__' not in classdict, '__slots__ must not be defined!'
        assert '__module__' in classdict, '__module__ must be defined!'
        # Validate all the parent classes.
        valid = []
        for base in bases:
            if base in cls.__REGISTRY:
                valid.append(cls.__REGISTRY[base])
            elif base in cls.__REGISTRY.values():
                valid.append(base)
            else:
                valid.append(cls.clone(base))
        # Wrap callables without thread mark.
        for key, value in classdict.items():
            if callable(value):
                classdict[key] = cls.__wrap(value)
        # Fix classdict and create new class.
        classdict.update({'__new__': cls.__new, '__slots__': (), '__module__':
                          '{}.{}'.format(__name__, classdict['__module__'])})
        cls.__REGISTRY[old] = new = \
            super().__new__(cls, name, tuple(valid), classdict)
        return new

    def __init__(self, name, bases, classdict, old=None):
        return super().__init__(name, bases, classdict)

    @staticmethod
    def __wrap(func):
        @functools.wraps(func)
        def safe(self, *args, **kwargs):
            return self.__exec(func, self, *args, **kwargs)
        return safe

    @classmethod
    def __new(meta, cls, *args, **kwargs):
        self = object.__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)
        if 'master' in kwargs:
            self.__exec = kwargs['master'].__exec
        else:
            array = tuple(meta.__REGISTRY.values())
            for value in args:
                if isinstance(value, array):
                    self.__exec = value.__exec
                    break
            else:
                self.__exec = Affinity()
        return self

This code can be used as a building block to make tkinter thread-safe by cloning its classes. The Affinity class automatically ensures that code is executed on a single thread, preventing GUI errors.

share|improve this answer

I've faced this error and I really wanted to use slots for my custom database nodes. Here is the test suite I've made (Its in Python 3.x):

import logging

A = None, 'attr1', 'attr2', 'attr3', 'attr4'

class C12(object):
    __slots__ = (A[1], A[2])

class C1234(object):
    __slots__ = (A[1], A[2], A[3], A[4])

class C34(object):
    __slots__ = (A[3], A[4])

class C3byC12(C12):
    __slots__ = (A[3])

class CEmpty(object):
    __slots__ = ()

MSG_FRM = '\n\tc1: {}\n\tc2: {}\n\t__slots__: {}'
NOT_DEF = 'not defined'

def test(c1, c2, slots):
    logging.debug('*'*20 + ' new class test ' + '*'*20)
    msg = MSG_FRM.format(c1, c2, slots)
    try:
        if slots == NOT_DEF:
            class TestClass(c1, c2): pass
        else:        
            class TestClass(c1, c2):
                __slots__ = slots
    except TypeError:
        logging.exception('BOOM!!! ' + msg)
    else:
        logging.debug('No Boom! ' + msg)
        instance = TestClass()
        if '__dict__' in dir(instance):
            logging.warning('Instance has __dict__!')
        else:
            logging.debug('Instance __slots__:{}'.format(
                          instance.__slots__))
        logging.debug('Attributes in instance dir: {}'.format(
            ' '.join(['X' if (a in dir(instance)) else '_'
                     for a in A[1:]])))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    logging.basicConfig(level=logging.DEBUG)
    test(C12, C34, (A[2], A[4]))
    test(C12, C3byC12, (A[2],))
    test(C3byC12, C12, (A[4],))
    test(C1234, C34, (A[2], A[4]))
    test(C1234, CEmpty, (A[2], A[4]))
    test(C12, CEmpty, (A[2], A[4]))
    test(C12, CEmpty, (A[1], A[2]))
    test(C12, CEmpty, ())
    test(CEmpty, C1234, (A[2], A[4]))
    test(CEmpty, C12, (A[3],))
    test(C12, C34, NOT_DEF)
    test(C12, CEmpty, NOT_DEF)

Here are the results:

DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
ERROR:root:BOOM!!!
        c1: <class '__main__.C12'>
        c2: <class '__main__.C34'>
        __slots__: ('attr2', 'attr4')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "boom.py", line 30, in test
    class TestClass(c1, c2):
TypeError: multiple bases have instance lay-out conflict
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
ERROR:root:BOOM!!!
        c1: <class '__main__.C12'>
        c2: <class '__main__.C3byC12'>
        __slots__: ('attr2',)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "boom.py", line 30, in test
    class TestClass(c1, c2):
TypeError: Cannot create a consistent method resolution
order (MRO) for bases C3byC12, C12
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
DEBUG:root:No Boom!
        c1: <class '__main__.C3byC12'>
        c2: <class '__main__.C12'>
        __slots__: ('attr4',)
DEBUG:root:Instance __slots__:('attr4',)
DEBUG:root:Attributes in instance dir: X X X X
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
ERROR:root:BOOM!!!
        c1: <class '__main__.C1234'>
        c2: <class '__main__.C34'>
        __slots__: ('attr2', 'attr4')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "boom.py", line 30, in test
    class TestClass(c1, c2):
TypeError: multiple bases have instance lay-out conflict
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
DEBUG:root:No Boom!
        c1: <class '__main__.C1234'>
        c2: <class '__main__.CEmpty'>
        __slots__: ('attr2', 'attr4')
DEBUG:root:Instance __slots__:('attr2', 'attr4')
DEBUG:root:Attributes in instance dir: X X X X
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
DEBUG:root:No Boom!
        c1: <class '__main__.C12'>
        c2: <class '__main__.CEmpty'>
        __slots__: ('attr2', 'attr4')
DEBUG:root:Instance __slots__:('attr2', 'attr4')
DEBUG:root:Attributes in instance dir: X X _ X
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
DEBUG:root:No Boom!
        c1: <class '__main__.C12'>
        c2: <class '__main__.CEmpty'>
        __slots__: ('attr1', 'attr2')
DEBUG:root:Instance __slots__:('attr1', 'attr2')
DEBUG:root:Attributes in instance dir: X X _ _
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
DEBUG:root:No Boom!
        c1: <class '__main__.C12'>
        c2: <class '__main__.CEmpty'>
        __slots__: ()
DEBUG:root:Instance __slots__:()
DEBUG:root:Attributes in instance dir: X X _ _
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
DEBUG:root:No Boom!
        c1: <class '__main__.CEmpty'>
        c2: <class '__main__.C1234'>
        __slots__: ('attr2', 'attr4')
DEBUG:root:Instance __slots__:('attr2', 'attr4')
DEBUG:root:Attributes in instance dir: X X X X
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
DEBUG:root:No Boom!
        c1: <class '__main__.CEmpty'>
        c2: <class '__main__.C12'>
        __slots__: ('attr3',)
DEBUG:root:Instance __slots__:('attr3',)
DEBUG:root:Attributes in instance dir: X X X _
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
ERROR:root:BOOM!!!
        c1: <class '__main__.C12'>
        c2: <class '__main__.C34'>
        __slots__: not defined
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "boom.py", line 28, in test
    class TestClass(c1, c2): pass
TypeError: multiple bases have instance lay-out conflict
DEBUG:root:******************** new class test ********************
DEBUG:root:No Boom!
        c1: <class '__main__.C12'>
        c2: <class '__main__.CEmpty'>
        __slots__: not defined
WARNING:root:Instance has __dict__!
DEBUG:root:Attributes in instance dir: X X _ _

As you can see you have two options:

  1. Either define __slots__ = () for all but one of the parent classes,
  2. or make one of the parents to subclass of the another.

Note that you should define __slots__ in the new class too, otherwise it gets a __dict__.

share|improve this answer
class superSlots:
      @property
      def __slots__(self):return self.MY_SLOTS
class A(superSlots):
      MY_SLOTS = "A","B"
class B(superSlots):
      MY_SLOTS = "A","B"
class C(A,B):
      MY_SLOTS = "X","Y"

maybe?? not positive that would be the best method but i think it would work fine

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4  
I think __slots__ is too magical and specially treated for this to work. I also suspect you're missing the point. –  Karl Knechtel Jun 2 '12 at 0:50
    
CPython 2.7 and 3.2 both say TypeError: Error when calling the metaclass bases 'property' object is not iterable when trying to define __slots__ as a property - it wouldn't really make sense to dynamically calculate __slots__ like this. –  James Jun 4 '12 at 22:09
    
meh all i did was test it in regular 2.7(not CPython) I didn't actually verify that it behaved properly ... –  Joran Beasley Jun 4 '12 at 22:26
    
Thanks for trying to provide an answer! The final results of this work can be seen as code.activestate.com/recipes/578152 (threadbox.py). It solves the slots problem. –  Noctis Skytower Jun 5 '12 at 19:24

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