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I need to know when a file that I'm downloading was created, or last written to. Just the date is all I need (such as 6/17/2011). Normally, the file's date can be sussed out by its name, such as "DonQuixoteWasRight.2011-06-17.log"

The problem is that the file can have all sorts of different naming formats, perhaps not even containing the date, such as "SanchoPanzaWasLeft.txt"

I thought maybe the FileInfo class would ride in to the rescue, but with this code:

FileInfo fInfo = new FileInfo(SelectedFileName);
//DateTime when = fInfo.CreationTime; //or CreationTimeUtc?
DateTime when = fInfo.LastWriteTime; //or LastWriteTimeUtc?
return when;

...It simply returns the time that I accessed the file (although I neither created it nor explicitly wrote to it). Neither CreationTime nor LastWriteTime return the true CreationTime or LastWriteTime of the file. Is there a way to find out?

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What do you see in Properties in explorer? –  SLaks Jun 1 '12 at 21:26
    
@SLaks: the same thing, namely, "Today, June 01, 2012, 1:47:10 PM" and so. –  B. Clay Shannon Jun 1 '12 at 21:30
    
Then it clearly isn't a C# issue. –  SLaks Jun 1 '12 at 21:32
    
It's something I'd like to solve using C#, though. –  B. Clay Shannon Jun 1 '12 at 21:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no true way to figure this out, whether the file is on a server or even if it is on your local computer, because the last modified date and other metadata can be changed by users.

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It sounds like you're trying to find out when the file was modified on the server.

Unless the server explicitly tells you somehow, there is no way to find that out.

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"Dang it!" <-- Kip Dynamite –  B. Clay Shannon Jun 1 '12 at 21:29

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