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I am using this code to convert a virtual key to WideString:

function VKeytoWideString (Key : Word) : WideString; 
var 
 WBuff         : array [0..255] of WideChar; 
 KeyboardState : TKeyboardState; 
 UResult       : Integer;
begin 
 Result := '';
 GetKeyBoardState (KeyboardState); 
 ZeroMemory(@WBuff[0], SizeOf(WBuff));
 UResult := ToUnicode(key, MapVirtualKey(key, 0), KeyboardState, WBuff, Length(WBuff), 0); 
 if UResult > 0 then
  SetString(Result, WBuff, UResult)
 else if UResult = -1 then
  Result := WBuff;
end; 

It works fine on my PC, but on a Chinese PC I get this:

foo

It converts the Chinese chars to Hanyu Pinyin. I think the function actually returns the raw input of the keyboard and not what the user actually wants to type in.

How should I handle this?

share|improve this question
2  
Most people on Stack Overflow do not read Chinese and thus won't be able to recognize the problem with the output you've shown. (It looks like Chinese to me! What's the problem?) Could you tell what input you gave to your function, what output you got, and what you expected or hoped to receive instead? Mentioning numeric character codes would probably help. –  Rob Kennedy Jun 1 '12 at 21:43
    
I can't tell you much either. A friend tested my program on a chinese Windows XP and I used a TNTMemo for Delphi7 on a KeyDown Event (that returns the Key as a word). After that I convert the key with the function above and put it in the memo. My friend says that it is supposed to have chinese characters in the memo just like on his notepad in windows. But Instead it shows him the Hanyu Pinyin of what he typed in. –  Benjamin Weiss Jun 1 '12 at 21:49
    
One KeyDown event can result in 0, 1, or more KeyPress events. This conversion is pretty complicated, and Windows performs it for you. Why are you trying to duplicate it? Is it not possible to listen to KeyPress events instead of KeyDown events? –  hvd Jun 4 '12 at 7:59
1  
@BenjaminWeiss The difference is that in KeyPress events, the virtual key codes are already converted to characters, and you only get events for those keys that correspond to characters. So if on an US Intl layout you press ', you get one KeyDown event, no KeyPress event, and one KeyUp event. Then press x, and you get another KeyDown event, followed by two KeyPress events (the ' and the x), and finally a KeyUp event for the x. Typing 'a with the same layout results in KeyDown(') KeyUp(') KeyDown(a) KeyPress(á) KeyUp(a). (That's a bit simplified, but the basic idea.) –  hvd Jun 5 '12 at 6:55
1  
@BenjaminWeiss: GetKeyboardLayout –  Martijn Jun 5 '12 at 12:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

As per the comments, here is an example of how you can avoid the problem by handling KeyPress events instead of manually converting KeyDown events. The TNT controls don't provide a WideChar KeyPress event, but it's fairly easy to add. Ideally, you should not put the extensions to TTntMemo and TTntForm in derived classes as I've done here, but instead modify the TNT source code.

The form contains two TTntMemo controls. Pressing keys in the first will log the events in the second.

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs, TntForms, StdCtrls, TntStdCtrls;

type
  TKeyPressWEvent = procedure(Sender: TObject; var Key: WideChar) of object;

  TTntMemo = class(TntStdCtrls.TTntMemo)
  private
    FOnKeyPressW: TKeyPressWEvent;
    procedure WMChar(var Msg: TWMChar); message WM_CHAR;
  protected
    function DoKeyPressW(var Message: TWMKey): Boolean;
    procedure KeyPressW(var Key: WideChar);
  published
    property OnKeyPressW: TKeyPressWEvent read FOnKeyPressW write FOnKeyPressW;
  end;

  TTntForm = class(TntForms.TTntForm)
  private
    FOnKeyPressW: TKeyPressWEvent;
    procedure WMChar(var Msg: TWMChar); message WM_CHAR;
  protected
    function DoKeyPressW(var Message: TWMKey): Boolean;
    procedure KeyPressW(var Key: WideChar);
  published
    property OnKeyPressW: TKeyPressWEvent read FOnKeyPressW write FOnKeyPressW;
  end;

  TForm1 = class(TTntForm)
    TntMemo1: TTntMemo;
    TntMemo2: TTntMemo;
    procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
    procedure FormKeyPressW(Sender: TObject; var Key: WideChar);
    procedure TntMemo1KeyPressW(Sender: TObject; var Key: WideChar);
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

uses
  TntControls;

{$R *.dfm}

type
  TWinControlAccess = class(TWinControl);
  TTntFormAccess = class(TTntForm);

function TntControl_DoKeyPressW(Self: TWinControl; var Message: TWMKey;
  KeyPressW: Pointer): Boolean;
type
  TKeyPressWProc = procedure(Self: TWinControl; var Key: WideChar);
var
  Form: TCustomForm;
  Ch: WideChar;
begin
  Result := True;
  Form := GetParentForm(Self);
  if (Form <> nil) and (Form <> Self) and Form.KeyPreview then
  begin
    if (Form is TTntForm) and TTntFormAccess(Form).DoKeyPressW(Message) then Exit;
    if TWinControlAccess(Form).DoKeyPress(Message) then Exit;
  end;
  if not (csNoStdEvents in Self.ControlStyle) then
  begin
    Ch := GetWideCharFromWMCharMsg(Message);
    TKeyPressWProc(KeyPressW)(Self, Ch);
    SetWideCharForWMCharMsg(Message, Ch);
    if Ch = #0 then Exit;
  end;
  Result := False;
end;

{ TTntMemo }

function TTntMemo.DoKeyPressW(var Message: TWMKey): Boolean;
begin
  Result := TntControl_DoKeyPressW(Self, Message, @TTntMemo.KeyPressW);
end;

procedure TTntMemo.KeyPressW(var Key: WideChar);
begin
  if Assigned(FOnKeyPressW) then FOnKeyPressW(Self, Key);
end;

procedure TTntMemo.WMChar(var Msg: TWMChar);
begin
  if not DoKeyPressW(Msg) then inherited;
end;

{ TTntForm }

function TTntForm.DoKeyPressW(var Message: TWMKey): Boolean;
begin
  Result := TntControl_DoKeyPressW(Self, Message, @TTntForm.KeyPressW);
end;

procedure TTntForm.KeyPressW(var Key: WideChar);
begin
  if Assigned(FOnKeyPressW) then FOnKeyPressW(Self, Key);
end;

procedure TTntForm.WMChar(var Msg: TWMChar);
begin
  if not DoKeyPressW(Msg) then inherited;
end;

{ TForm1 }

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Self.OnKeyPressW := FormKeyPressW;
  TntMemo1.OnKeyPressW := TntMemo1KeyPressW;
end;

procedure TForm1.FormKeyPressW(Sender: TObject; var Key: WideChar);
begin
  TntMemo2.Lines.Add(WideString('FormKeyPress: ') + Key);
end;

procedure TForm1.TntMemo1KeyPressW(Sender: TObject; var Key: WideChar);
begin
  TntMemo2.Lines.Add(WideString('TntMemo1KeyPress: ') + Key);
end;

end.
share|improve this answer

I haven’t got much experience with typing Chinese either, but I suspect this is the IME (Input Method Editor) kicking in. That’s what allows Chinese users to type in pinyin, which will then be translated into ideographic characters (otherwise, you’d need a keyboard with some 1000+ keys...)

The Virtual Keycodes are directly related to the keyboard, and so will, of necessity, only correspond to the entered keys. So your function works fine: it converts a VKEY code to a WideChar. To do what you want, you’ll have to write a second function, which would convert pinyin to characters.

If you want to do this specifically for Chinese, I’ll bet there’s functions for doing this out there. If you want to make it more generic, and independent of locale and language, then perhaps it’s possible to interface with the IME for the relevant TMemo, but if so, I haven’t got a clue. My best guess would be to search MSDN for IME.

But, to echo hvd’s comment: what do you want to accomplish here?

Wouldn’t it be easier to just copy the text of the TMemo?

share|improve this answer
    
I can't copy it to the TMemo just like that. It has to be a UNICODE Char. I just need like a 'Copy' of the char. –  Benjamin Weiss Jun 5 '12 at 8:27
    
@BenjaminWeiss: What version of Delphi are you using? If 2009 or later, Char = WideChar. In earlier versions, you can use WideCharToMultiByte to convert the WideChar to the corresponding character in the TMemo’s active code page. –  Martijn Jun 5 '12 at 8:41
    
@Martijn Delphi 7 with TNT controls, according to the comments on the question, so Char = AnsiChar, but TTntMemo.Lines.Text is a WideString :) –  hvd Jun 5 '12 at 8:44
    
@hvd: indeed, so why doesn’t Benjamin copy the text of the TTntMemo? –  Martijn Jun 5 '12 at 9:02
1  
@BenjaminWeiss: that doesn’t answer my question. If you copy the text of the TTntMemo, you still have a "copy" of it. Where’s the problem? Or are you trying to implement a filter, so you can prevent specific characters from being displayed? –  Martijn Jun 5 '12 at 9:11

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