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I am writing a C++ program to solve a common problem of message decoding. Part of the problem requires me to get a bunch of random characters, including '\', and map them to a key, one by one.

My program works fine in most cases, except that when I read characters such as '\' from a string, I obviously get a completely different character representation (e.g. '\0' yields a null character, or '\' simply escapes itself when it needs to be treated as a character).

Since I am not supposed to have any control on what character keys are included, I have been desperately trying to find a way to treat special control characters such as the backslash as the character itself.

My questions are basically these:

  • Is there a way to turn all special characters off within the scope of my program?

  • Is there a way to override current digraphs definitions of special characters and define them as something else (like digraphs using very rare keys)?

  • Is there some obscure method on the String class that I missed which can force the actual character on the string to be read instead of the pre-defined constant?

I have been trying to look for a solution for hours now but all possible fixes I've found are for other languages.

Any help is greatly appreciate.

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"\" is special only within a string/charater literal -- not external data read in: it has no inherent meaning as the content of a string object! The @"\verbatim\string\" literal can be used (and the char literal '\\' is a trivial case), but once again, this only affects a literal value occurring in source. (This does not preclude that special meaning is attached to "\" in the external data source. And, indeed in certain sources, such as in a Regexp, still has meaning.) –  user166390 Jun 1 '12 at 21:57
    
Where is your string coming from? Is it hardcoded? User input? File IO? –  Linuxios Jun 1 '12 at 22:03
    
"I obviously get a completely different character representation" It may be obvious to you but I have no idea what that means. When you read a character you get a character, what's the exact problem? –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 1 '12 at 23:33
    
"I obviously get a completely different character representation" It may be obvious to you but I have no idea what that means. When you read a character you get a character, what's the exact problem? -- I meant to say that within the string literal, character combinations are not read the way we read them (e.g. "\n" is not a subarray containing '\','n'). They do produce a character, but because I am trying to decode a message using exact characters, the character I get is useless. –  carv85x Jun 2 '12 at 20:58
    
Thank you very much for your responses. Since the input is supposed to come from a file, I have to use something like fstream to read from the file, so I thought that what I would import as a line would be treated the same way as a string literal coded in my program. Some random combinations from sample input I read had random occurrences of '\', followed by some other random character. I mainly need to treat that '\' as a \, or else the pattern I would get would not be the same. –  carv85x Jun 2 '12 at 21:04
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1 Answer

If you read in a string like "\0" from stdin or a file, it will be treated as two separate characters: '\\' and '0'. There is no additional processing that you have to do.

Escaping characters is only used for string/character literals. That is to say, when you want to hard-code something into your source code.

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