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I have been trying to figure this out from other posts here, but couldn't.

I have a Python dictionary

old_dict = { (1,'a') : [2],
          (2,'b') : [3,4],
          (3,'x') : [5],
          (4,'y') : [5],
          (5,'b') : [3,4], 
          (5,'c') : [6],
          }

I need to reverse this so that as a result I would have:

new_dict = { (6,'c') : [5],
          (5,'x') : [3],
          (5,'y') : [4],
          (4,'b') : [5, 2],
          (3,'b') : [5, 2], 
          (2,'a') : [1],
          }

(This describes the edges of a finite state machine, and I need to run it backwards: it has to accept the reverse inputs as it would have before)

For instance, in old_dict, the first key was a list (1, 'a') : [2], and now, this one should become (2, 'a'), [1] ... or (4,'y') : [5] becomes (5,'y') : [4] etc. - I hope it is understandable what I mean.

I have been trying to solve this with list comprehensions, but no success yet.

Update: I tried F.C.'s suggestion, but somehow I can't get the code to work. I inserted it into a function, like so:

old_dict1 = { (1,'a') : [2],
          (2,'b') : [3,4],
          (3,'x') : [5],
          (4,'y') : [5],
          (5,'b') : [3,4], 
          (5,'c') : [6],
          }

def reverse_dict(old_dict):
    new_dict = {}
    add_to_dict = new_dict.setdefault

    map(lambda kv: add_to_dict(kv[0], []).append(kv[1]),   
        sum([[((x, k[1]), k[0]) for x in v] for k, v in old_dict.items()],
            []))        # sum will take this to start adding
    return new_dict

new_dict1 = reverse_dict(old_dict1)

print(new_dict1)

But I only get returned an empty dictionary {}

Am I doing something wrong ? (I have really very little knowledge of Python, so please forgive me if I made a mistake that's too silly ...)

share|improve this question
    
I worked the information in the answer that you posted into your question. Feel free to delete it again if you don't think it's relevant any longer. –  senderle Jun 2 '12 at 16:21
    
@senderle Thanks ... I still don't get this one to work, still get just an empty dictionary returned. But anyway, your other post had worked perfectly fine for me already ! –  Jens Jun 2 '12 at 18:36
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3 Answers

This is complex enough that I wouldn't bother with list comprehensions. Also, I'm assuming you aren't looking for the value lists to be in any strict order.

new_dict = {}
for k, vals in old_dict.items():
    k_num, k_char = k
    for num in vals:
        new_dict.setdefault((num, k_char), []).append(k_num)

Or using a defaultdict:

new_dict = collections.defaultdict(list)
for k, vals in old_dict.items():
    k_num, k_char = k
    for num in vals:
        new_dict[(num, k_char)].append(k_num)

For those interested in being as terse as possible, it occurs to me that this more compressed version is an option as well. I'm not sure how I feel about this from a readability standpoint, so I changed the variable names for a bit more clarity:

new_dict = collections.defaultdict(list)
for (num_in, char_in), nums_out in old_dict.items():
    for num_out in nums_out:
        new_dict[(num_out, char_in)].append(num_in)
share|improve this answer
1  
I would recommend using items() instead of iteritems() because it works for both Python 2.x and 3.x, and the OP's problem doesn't seem like something that would be adversely affected by getting a fully formed list (in the case of Python 2.x). Generally speaking, I think we should be recommending the Python 3 syntax as long as it also works in Python 2 and no version was specified. –  John Y Jun 1 '12 at 22:23
    
@JohnY, I think that's a really good point. But on the other hand, I've had my fair share of commentators complain about my not using iteritems in the past. I've gotten into the habit of using iteritems more as a way of signaling that I am aware of the issues at hand, and that I assume my reader is too. Then, if it comes up, I can always add the necessary caveats. Also -- you won't get any warnings if you use items wastefully in Python 2, but in Python 3, you'll realize something's wrong right away if you try to use iteritems. So I'm inclined to stick with iteritems for now. –  senderle Jun 1 '12 at 22:39
    
Hi senderle and JohnY, thanks ... to be honest, I don't know either of the two, but in any case: do I have to import some library to make this work ? I get an error 'dict' object has no attribute 'iteritems' What am I doing wrong ? –  Jens Jun 2 '12 at 11:20
1  
@Jens Follow John Y's advice of using items() instead of iteritems(). –  Janne Karila Jun 2 '12 at 11:58
    
@JohnY, words.eat(). –  senderle Jun 2 '12 at 12:57
show 3 more comments

I think that there is a problem in your understanding of the purpose of a dict. The dict data structure shouldn't be thought of as being ordered in any particular way since it uses a hash table for accessing the elements. You should read the docs and the note on the implementation detail in .items() here is also important. It turns out that the implementation may give you the order that you seem to be expecting, but you shouldn't count on it.

If the order is important to you, then you should use a list in at least the part of your code where the order is important. Use the .items() method on your dict to get the list of (key,value) pairs, then you can sort them any way you want using the usual sorting methods on lists.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I know only very little Python, indeed ... but a dictionary is a key-value pair, and I basically want to make the key the value, and the value the key (where the key is a tuple, and the value a list of one or more items), without bothering about the order of the keys at all. –  Jens Jun 2 '12 at 11:13
    
Sorry for my misunderstanding. When I read what you wanted I must have been in a hurry when I was reading. –  Ken Jun 3 '12 at 4:16
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This works with your data, take it as an ugly hack just for fun.

It would be better to do it in more lines of code so it can be easier to understand but sometimes I can't resist the temptation to write this contraptions.

Hope it helps.

def reverse_dict(old_dict):
    """
    >>> sorted(reverse_dict({(1,'a'): [2],
    ...               (2,'b'): [3,4],
    ...               (3,'x'): [5],
    ...               (4,'y'): [5],
    ...               (5,'b'): [3,4], 
    ...               (5,'c'): [6],
    ...              }).items())
    [((2, 'a'), [1]), ((3, 'b'), [2, 5]), ((4, 'b'), [2, 5]), ((5, 'x'), [3]), ((5, 'y'), [4]), ((6, 'c'), [5])]
    """
    new_dict = {}
    add_to_dict = new_dict.setdefault       # you could use a [defaultdict][1] instead

    map(lambda kv: add_to_dict(kv[0], []).append(kv[1]),   # if kv[0] not in dict get [] and add to it
        sum([[((x, k[1]), k[0]) for x in v] for k, v in old_dict.items()],
            []))        # sum will take this to start adding
    return new_dict

To test the code just copy it to a file so.py and run it like this:

$ python -m doctest so.py -v
Trying:
    sorted(reverse_dict({(1,'a'): [2],
                  (2,'b'): [3,4],
                  (3,'x'): [5],
                  (4,'y'): [5],
                  (5,'b'): [3,4], 
                  (5,'c'): [6],
                 }).items())
Expecting:
    [((2, 'a'), [1]), ((3, 'b'), [2, 5]), ((4, 'b'), [2, 5]), ((5, 'x'), [3]), ((5, 'y'), [4]), ((6, 'c'), [5])]
ok
1 items had no tests:
    so
1 items passed all tests:
   1 tests in so.reverse_dict
1 tests in 2 items.
1 passed and 0 failed.
Test passed.

It uses doctest to make it easier to test if its doing what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi F.C. thank you. Somehow I am not able to make it work ... If the code is as follows: –  Jens Jun 2 '12 at 10:52
    
old_dict1 = { (1,'a') : [2], (2,'b') : [3,4], (3,'x') : [5], (4,'y') : [5], (5,'b') : [3,4], (5,'c') : [6], } def reverse_dict(old_dict): new_dict = {} add_to_dict = new_dict.setdefault # you could use a [defaultdict][1] instead map(lambda kv: add_to_dict(kv[0], []).append(kv[1]), # if kv[0] not in dict get [] and add to it sum([[((x, k[1]), k[0]) for x in v] for k, v in old_dict.items()], [])) # sum will take this to start adding return new_dict –  Jens Jun 2 '12 at 10:57
    
do you get an error or wrong output? –  F.C. Jun 2 '12 at 14:32
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