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I'm trying to write a wrapper synchronous method around async_read to allow non blocking reads on a socket. Following several examples around internet I have developed a solution that seems to be almost right but which is not working.

The class declares these relevant attributes and methods:

class communications_client
{
    protected:
        boost::shared_ptr<boost::asio::io_service> _io_service;
        boost::shared_ptr<boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket> _socket;
        boost::array<boost::uint8_t, 128> _data;

        boost::mutex _mutex;
        bool _timeout_triggered;
        bool _message_received;
        boost::system::error_code _error;
        size_t _bytes_transferred;

        void handle_read(const boost::system::error_code & error, size_t bytes_transferred);
        void handle_timeout(const boost::system::error_code & error);
        size_t async_read_helper(unsigned short bytes_to_transfer, const boost::posix_time::time_duration & timeout, boost::system::error_code & error);

        ...
}

The method async_read_helper is the one that encapsulates all the complexity, while the other two handle_readand handle_timeout are just the event handlers. Here is the implementation of the three methods:

void communications_client::handle_timeout(const boost::system::error_code & error)
{
    if (!error)
    {
        _mutex.lock();
        _timeout_triggered = true;
        _error.assign(boost::system::errc::timed_out, boost::system::system_category());
        _mutex.unlock();
    }
}

void communications_client::handle_read(const boost::system::error_code & error, size_t bytes_transferred)
{
    _mutex.lock();
    _message_received = true;
    _error = error;
    _bytes_transferred = bytes_transferred;
    _mutex.unlock();
}

size_t communications_client::async_read_helper(unsigned short bytes_to_transfer, const boost::posix_time::time_duration & timeout, boost::system::error_code & error)
{
    _timeout_triggered = false;
    _message_received = false;

    boost::asio::deadline_timer timer(*_io_service);
    timer.expires_from_now(timeout);
    timer.async_wait(
        boost::bind(
            &communications_client::handle_timeout,
            this,
            boost::asio::placeholders::error));

    boost::asio::async_read(
        *_socket,
        boost::asio::buffer(_data, 128),
        boost::asio::transfer_exactly(bytes_to_transfer),
        boost::bind(
            &communications_client::handle_read,
            this,
            boost::asio::placeholders::error,
            boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred));

    while (true)
    {
        _io_service->poll_one();
        if (_message_received)
        {
            timer.cancel();
            break;
        }
        else if (_timeout_triggered)
        {
            _socket->cancel();
            break;
        }
    }

    return _bytes_transferred;
}

The main question I have is: why this works with a loop on _io_service->poll_one()and no without a loop and calling _io_service->run_one()? Also, I would like to know if it looks correct to anyone who is more used to work with Boost and Asio. Thank you!


FIX PROPOSAL #1

According to the comments done by Jonathan Wakely the loop could be replaced using _io_service->run_one() with a call to _io_service->reset() after the operations have finished. It should look like:

_io_service->run_one();
if (_message_received)
{
    timer.cancel();
}
else if (_timeout_triggered)
{
    _socket->cancel();
}

_io_service->reset();

After some testing, I have checked that this kind of solution alone is not working. The handle_timeoutmethod is being called continuously with the error code operation_aborted. How can these calls be stopped?

FIX PROPOSAL #2

The answer by twsansbury is accurate and based onto solid documentation basis. That implementation leads to the following code within the async_read_helper:

while (_io_service->run_one())
{
    if (_message_received)
    {
        timer.cancel();
    }
    else if (_timeout_triggered)
    {
        _socket->cancel();
    }
}
_io_service->reset();

and the following change to the handle_read method:

void communications_client::handle_read(const boost::system::error_code & error, size_t bytes_transferred)
{
    if (error != boost::asio::error::operation_aborted)
    {
        ...
    }
}

This solution has proved solid and correct during testing.

share|improve this question
    
The mutex locking/unlocking looks wrong, you should use boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> to lock and have it unlock automatically in the destructor. –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 2 '12 at 0:06
    
@JonathanWakely that solution would be more boost-like. It's pthread fault... :) But, as I understand, the outcome of both implementations should be same. –  yeyeyerman Jun 2 '12 at 0:16
    
And since you edited it you don't have a mutex protecting the reads of _message_received and _timeout_triggered. Also I assume pan_tilt_EN304_client should be communications_client? –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 2 '12 at 0:17
    
Are you calling _io_service->reset() in the version using run_one() that doesn't work? –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 2 '12 at 0:22
    
@JonathanWakely sorry i'm fixing the code while you trying to answer. 1. it seems that the extra lock/unlock around the attributes are not necessary at that point because there no async operations running at that point. 2. in the run_oneversion i wasn't calling _io_service->reset(). That makes sense because the problem was that it kept reading the same bytes all the time. –  yeyeyerman Jun 2 '12 at 0:29
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

The main difference between io_service::run_once() and io_service::poll_once() is that run_once() will block until a handler is ready to run, whereas poll_once() will not wait for any outstanding handlers to become ready.

Assuming the only outstanding handlers on _io_service are handle_timeout() and handle_read(), then run_once() does not require a loop because it will only return once either handle_timeout() or handle_read() have ran. On the other hand, poll_once() requires a loop because poll_once() will return immediately, as neither handle_timeout() nor handle_read() are ready to run, causing the function to eventually return.

The main issue with the original code, as well as the fix proposal #1, is that there are still outstanding handlers in the io_service when async_read_helper() returns. Upon the next call to async_read_helper(), the next handler to be invoked will be a handler from the previous call. The io_service::reset() method only allows the io_service to resume running from a stopped state, it does not remove any handlers already queued into the io_service. To account for this behavior, try using a loop to consume all of the handlers from the io_service. Once all handlers have been consumed, exit the loop and reset the io_service:

// Consume all handlers.
while ( _io_service->run_once() )
{
  if ( _message_received )
  {
    // Message received, so cancel the timer.  This will force the completion of
    // handle_timer, with boost::asio::error::operation_aborted as the error.
    timer.cancel();
  }
  else if ( _timeout_triggered )
  {
    // Timeout occured, so cancel the socket.  This will force the completion of
    // handle_read, with boost::asio::error::operation_aborted as the error.
    _socket->cancel();
  }
}

// Reset service, guaranteeing it is in a good state for subsequential runs.
_io_service->reset();
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't the cancel() methods prevent the outstanding handlers from being called? –  yeyeyerman Jun 4 '12 at 9:40
    
No, cancel() forces the completion of any outstanding handlers with an error of boost::asio::error::operation_aborted. Handlers are only removed from a service in the service's destructor. Also, cancel() will not affect the case where both handle_timeout() and handle_read() succeed without error, such as when the timeout occurs immediately after data is received on the socket. –  Tanner Sansbury Jun 4 '12 at 12:12
    
If the handlers are being executed sequentally, is there any need for the lock/unlock clauses? –  yeyeyerman Jun 5 '12 at 15:57
    
Based on the posted code, it is safe to remove the lock and unlocks. However, be very cautious. Member variables, such as _error and _bytes_transferred are subject to concurrency issues from other member functions in communications_client or derived classes due to their protected accessibility. Consider reducing access with private or refactoring the desired behavior into an async_read_timeout() free function that mimics async_read concepts. –  Tanner Sansbury Jun 5 '12 at 19:11
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