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I'm a beginner in C and have been trying to figure out what has gone wrong with my code code for the past hour or two. I have been following through K&Rs book and I keep looking through it but still do not understand my logic mistake.

while (*argv>0){
    while (**argv>0){
        printf("%c\n",**argv);
        **argv++;
    }
    argv++;
}

Task:Print out all the arguments being fed to my program using argv.

To my understanding, argv is a pointer to an array that contains further pointers to arrays of character pointers. So, I said that while *argv>0 or while the first array still has elements, we should follow the pointers from the first array to the next array. Then we should print out all the elements in the next array.

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Thinking in terms of patterns is very helpful. Notice that you have *argv and argv++ in the outer loop, but **argv and **argv++ in the inner loop; one of those must be wrong ... in fact, **argv++ is wrong and should be *argv++. –  Jim Balter Jun 2 '12 at 3:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Too many * in this line:

**argv++;

It should be like this:

*argv++;

Plus additional braces, because the ++ operation has higher priority:

(*argv)++;

And it will work.

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Isn't it dangerous to leave the while statement checking that argv>0? You don't know whats in the memory after argv, or is there some standard that argv is always followed by 0's? Edit: I just read below that there is guarantee that argv[argc] is a null pointer... so nevermind. –  Adam Cadien Jun 2 '12 at 1:22
    
@AdamCadien I believe it's still dangerous to do argv > 0 (instead of argv != 0), as I can't find any guarantee that a null pointer constant must compare less that other pointers. –  KennyTM Jun 2 '12 at 7:01
    
@Adam Cadien: yes, the standard defines that the element argv[argc] is always a null pointer. However, KennyTM's criticism still applies. –  0xC0000022L Jun 2 '12 at 15:38

I suggest you don't confuse yourself by using pointer dereferencing the way you do when the subscript notation ([]) allows you to do the same.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int i;
    for(i = 0; argv[i]; i++)
        printf("%s\n", argv[i]);
    return 0;
}

This will also print argv[0], which is the name/path of the program.

Now what does my code do? for(i = 0; argv[i]; i++) counts up i from 0 to the element when argv[i] resolves to false (i.e. 0 aka NULL), that is the last element of the argv array. And then for every element in the array it uses the %s format specifier of printf to print it. You could also pass the argv[i] as the first and only parameter to printf, but that is usually frowned upon as it opens the door for certain string formatting attacks.

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2  
passing the string as the only argument wont even produce correct results a lot of the time. e.g. the string "C:\never" will result in "C:" + newline + "ever". –  chacham15 Jun 2 '12 at 0:42
    
@chacham15: I was more hinting at security-relevant attacks, but that's true, too. –  0xC0000022L Jun 2 '12 at 0:44
2  
+1 for sticking to the obscure guarantee that argv[argc] will be a null pointer. –  ArjunShankar Jun 2 '12 at 0:56
    
chacham15's point is that it isn't just frowned up, it's downright wrong ... if the first argument contains % characters, the program is likely to crash. puts(argv[i]) does what you want. –  Jim Balter Jun 2 '12 at 3:35

argv is of type char *argv[] i.e. a pointer to an array of strings (char*'s). argv++ moves to the next string in the array.

Usually this function would be written as follows:


int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
   int i;
   for (i = 0; i < argc; i++){ //loop from 0 to argc (argument count)
      printf("%s ", argv[i]);
   }
   return 0;
}


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cdecl is a nice resource to understand C's typing: http://cdecl.ridiculousfish.com/?q=char+*argv%5B%5D –  Kay Jun 2 '12 at 0:34
1  
You might want to explicitly mention: argc contains the number of arguments. –  ArjunShankar Jun 2 '12 at 0:35
    
Neat. +1 for argc :) –  ArjunShankar Jun 2 '12 at 0:55

this will work::

while(argc--)//can't use *argv here, because *argv would be the  address of the 
              // element which argv is pointing to, just by knowing the address u can't say whether it still has elements or not
{
    while( **argv )
    {
        printf("%c", **argv);
        (*argv)++;  //by using **argv++, you are actually moving argv to next array, not to the next character of current array 
    }
    argv++;
    printf("\n");//move your \n to here, else you will end up printing every character in a new line
}
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