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So the majority of desktop and laptop screens nowadays have a width greater than the height. The screen is "wide" not "tall." Smart phones have done something rather cool by enabling the orientation of the phone to influence how the content is presented.

I'd like to do this with media queries, so that if someone on a mac with a big monitor has their browser window sized so that it's very "tall" (height is greater than width) they would see a header and footer. But if they went fullscreen or "wide" (width is greater than height) they would see a sidebar on the left and maybe also the right.

I'm trying to take full advantage of wide screens, and orientations and such. If anyone know how to do this with media queries or javascript, let me know!

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm sure you have it by now, but here is an example for others who pass by. Like the previous person said, people should take the time to read this: http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-mediaqueries/

Now, here is an answer. You can put "landscape" or "portrait" in conjunction with widths and heights in your @media rules. This assumes that height is greater then width and visa versa. I usually only use min-width and then have a few separate @media rules for those specifically. One example would be landscape: horizontal scroll (desktop) and portait: regular vertical (tablet/phone )

Those 2 wouldn't do it alone though, you'll need some combinations. I think we can asume your side bar would be a hindrance on screens smaller then 600px wide.

/* ==================== *\
    01
\* ==================== */

@media (min-width: 0) { /* =================================== */

   .main-content {
     width: 100%;
     float: left;
   }

   .side-bar {
     width: 100%;
     float: left
   }

} /* ========================================================== */


/* ==================== *\
    02
\* ==================== */

@media (min-width: 60em) and (orientation:landscape) { /* ====== */

   .main-content {
     width: 70%;
     float: left;
   }

   .side-bar {
     width: 30%;
     float: left
   }

} /* ========================================================== */

HERE is a jsfiddle - note that box-sizing: border-box; is used for padding issues.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much, Derek! I settled into a similar habit. Make things liquid and then establish breakpoints where the layout needs to change. I've also been thinking about setting my base font sizes in inches or centimeters, because there's such a huge variety of resolutions and pixel densities nowadays. – Costa Apr 11 '13 at 17:40
    
I set my base body{font-size: 62.5%} so that 1em = 10px etc. Then I only use ems. Even for borders. .1em solid red etc. – sheriffderek Apr 11 '13 at 21:46
    
There's a problem with setting the base font below 100%. I forget where I read about this. I think media queries don't necessarily listen to the base, or something..... Here we go. First bullet in this blog post: filamentgroup.com/lab/… – Costa Apr 12 '13 at 19:45

Media Queries are probably going to be your solution here for the modern browsers that support it. You can grab a copy of the documentation from here:

http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-mediaqueries/

But you might find the following tutorial useful (Google for: Media Queries Tutorial):

http://webdesignerwall.com/tutorials/css3-media-queries

Once you pick up the basics doing things like hiding elements if the screen falls below a specific resolution:

@media screen and (max-width: 600px)
{
  .sidebar
  {
    display: none;
  }
}

Hope this helps.

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2  
I fully understand everything you've described so far, in fact I've used the technique above in my projects ie: tedxgramercy.jit.su/team That one is kinda fun, try resizing the browser window. So that's nice, but I was kinda hoping you'd go on to answer my question. Your response kinda ended mid sentence. Maybe it got cut off... – Costa Jun 2 '12 at 2:41

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