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I have a nested list, and I need to reverse every element in the list. But I dont know whether the list is a list of list of list or not. So example is:

p = [1, [2, 3, [4, [5, 6]]]]
print deep_reverse(p)
#>>> [[[[6, 5], 4], 3, 2], 1]

q =  [1, [2,3], 4, [5,6]]
print deep_reverse(q)
#>>> [ [6,5], 4, [3, 2], 1]

What I have so far is:

def is_list(p):
    return isinstance(p, list)

def deep_reverse(a):
    a.reverse()
    for i in a:
        if is_list(i):
            i.reverse()
            print a

It works well for the second test, the q one, but doest work for the first test. I am not sure do I need use a recursion to loop the whole thing? How can I modify my code? Thanks.

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1  
Yes you do need recursion. (Have you attempted to do so?) –  dbaupp Jun 2 '12 at 1:32
2  
Smells like homework –  inspectorG4dget Jun 2 '12 at 1:33
    
Your function only goes 2 levels deep into the list. As dbaupp said, you need to utilize recursion. As a hint, your answer is correct except for 1 line ;) –  Joel Cornett Jun 2 '12 at 1:37
    
for such a simple thing like isinstance(p, list) you don't need to disguise it in your own function –  jamylak Jun 2 '12 at 6:29
1  
So this question, and your other one ( stackoverflow.com/questions/10845321/…) are from the Udacity ( udacity.com) CS 101 Final. I'm not a teacher or anything...but I wouldn't think the best way to understand computer science is to have people on stackoverflow answering your exam questions for you. So I guess you're right, it isn't a "homework" problem. –  sirwebber Aug 10 '12 at 16:35

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason your code doesn't work is because if i is a list of lists, you don't deep_reverse the lists within i.

You only need to change one line of your code to the following:

def is_list(p):
    return isinstance(p, list)

def deep_reverse(a):
    a.reverse()
    for i in a:
        if is_list(i):
            deep_reverse(i)  # <=== This is what changed
            print a
share|improve this answer
    
:thank you so much for your help. It works!!!Thanks you. –  Maggie Mi Jun 2 '12 at 23:23

Hmmm... If only there were a way to deeply reverse all of the sublists as well....

**wink**

share|improve this answer
def deep_reverse(lst):
    try:
        if len(lst) > 1:
            return list(deep_reverse(item) for item in reversed(lst))
        return lst
    except TypeError:
        return lst
share|improve this answer
1  
If you check the type in there you won't need exception handling: return [i if type(i) != list else deep_reverse(i) for i in lst[::-1]]. This should let you reverse with disparate types in the list. –  Jeremy Pridemore Jun 2 '12 at 3:33
2  
@JeremyPridemore Don't ever check type like that, use isinstance –  jamylak Jun 2 '12 at 6:17
2  
Use reversed instead of [::-1] –  jamylak Jun 2 '12 at 6:32
    
@jamylak: Thanks for the tip about the reversed, I forgot about that one. –  Jeff Mercado Jun 2 '12 at 7:15
    
@jamylak Thanks for the tips. I'm still learning Python, and using some SO questions for good problems to solve. –  Jeremy Pridemore Jun 2 '12 at 18:00
>>> def deep_reverse(L):
        for item in reversed(L):
            if isinstance(item,list):
                yield list(deep_reverse(item))
            else:
                yield item


>>> p = [1, [2, 3, [4, [5, 6]]]]
>>> q =  [1, [2,3], 4, [5,6]]
>>> list(deep_reverse(p))
[[[[6, 5], 4], 3, 2], 1]
>>> list(deep_reverse(q))
[[6, 5], 4, [3, 2], 1]
share|improve this answer

HERE IS THE CORRECT SOLUTION

def is_list(p):
    return isinstance(p, list)

def deep_reverse(p):

 if p==[]:
    return p

 if not is_list(p[0]):
    return deep_reverse(p[1:])+[p[0]]

 else:
    return deep_reverse(p[1:])+[deep_reverse(p[0])]
share|improve this answer
def deep_reverse(L):
    if L == []:
        return L
    elif type(L) == int:
        return L
    else:
        return deep_reverse(L[1:]) + [deep_reverse(L[0])]

>>> print deep_reverse(p)
[[[[6, 5], 4], 3, 2], 1]

>>> print deep_reverse(q)
[[6, 5], 4, [3, 2], 1]

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
Use isinstance(..) instead of type(..) == ... –  dbaupp Jun 2 '12 at 6:44
def deep_reverse(ls):  
    for i in ls:  
        if type(i)==list:deep_reverse(i)  
    ls.reverse()  
share|improve this answer
2  
use isinstance instead –  jamylak Jun 2 '12 at 6:21

here is a suggestion :

def deep_reverse(lst):
    if isinstance(lst ,list):
        if sum(1 for x in lst if isinstance(x, list)) == 0:
                        lst = lst[::-1]
                        return lst
        else :
            lst = lst[::-1]
            lst = [deep_reverse(item) for item in lst]     
            return lst
    else:
         return lst
share|improve this answer
def is_list(p):
    return isinstance(p, list)

def deep_reverse(p):

 if p==[]:
    return p

 if not is_list(p):
    return p
 else:
    return deep_reverse(p[1:])+[deep_reverse(p[0])]

test ok.

share|improve this answer

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