Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to build a bash script that reads a file and produces some command line parameters. my input file looks like

20.83      0.05     0.05  __adddf3
20.83      0.10     0.05  __aeabi_fadd
16.67      0.14     0.04  gaussian_smooth
8.33      0.16     0.02   __aeabi_ddiv

I must detect and copy all the __* strings and turncate them into a command such as

gprof -E __adddf3 -E __aeabi_fadd -E __aeabi_ddiv ./nameof.out

So far I use

#!/bin/bash
while read line
do
    if [[ "$line" == *__* ]] 
    then
        echo $line;
    fi
done <input.txt

to detect the requested lines but i guess, what i need is a one-line-command thing that i can't figure out. Any kind suggestions?

share|improve this question
1  
@shellter: == works fin with globbing. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 2 '12 at 3:44
    
@DennisWilliamson - correct, but I assume you mean "fine". –  jordanm Jun 2 '12 at 6:23
1  
@jordanm: I said "fin" probably because I was looking at the name of the person who edited this question. ;-) –  Dennis Williamson Jun 2 '12 at 7:35
    
@shellter: It means equal here, too. It's just equal to something with wildcards. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 2 '12 at 14:17
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Modifying your script:

#!/bin/bash
while read -r _ _ _ arg
do
    if [[ $arg == __* ]] 
    then
        args+=("-E" "$arg")
    fi
done <input.txt
gprof "${args[@]}" ./nameof.out

The underscores are valid variable names and serve to discard the fields you don't need.

The final line executes the command with the arguments.

You can feed the result of another command into the while loop by using process substitution:

#!/bin/bash
while read -r _ _ _ arg
do
    if [[ $arg == __* ]] 
    then
        args+=("-E" "$arg")
    fi
done < <(gprof some arguments filename)
gprof "${args[@]}" ./nameof.out
share|improve this answer
    
@user1431903: See my edited answer. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 2 '12 at 10:43
    
Perfect! Exactly what i was looking for! Thank you. –  Dimitris Jun 2 '12 at 10:49
    
thumbs up Dennis. Thank you. –  Dimitris Jun 3 '12 at 18:49
add comment

Using awk:

awk '$4 ~/^__/{a=a" -E "$4}END{system("gprof "a" ./nameof.out")}' inputFile
share|improve this answer
    
That is perfect! I just need to turn that print into an executable command, so run instead of print. –  Dimitris Jun 2 '12 at 3:30
    
@user1431903: updated. –  Prince John Wesley Jun 2 '12 at 3:41
    
system() instead of print is the answer! :-) –  Dimitris Jun 2 '12 at 3:42
    
@user1431903 - don't forget to "accept" the answer by clicking on the arrow. –  ghoti Jun 2 '12 at 3:46
    
@ghoti I didn't. I'm just searching for a solution without awk –  Dimitris Jun 2 '12 at 10:46
add comment

One more way to skin the cat:

gprof `sed -ne '/__/s/.* / -E /p' input.txt` ./nameof.out

The sed script searches for lines with __, then changes everything up to the last space with -E and prints the result. You may have to adjust things a little if your whitespace could include tabs. For clarity, I didn't account for that here.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.