Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a DP problem in which a string of words with space removed, and I need to implement both buttom-up and memoization version to split the string into individual english words. However, I got the buttom-up version, however, the memoization seems a little complicated.

 /* Split a string into individual english words
 * @String str the str to be splitted
 * @Return a sequence of words separated by space if successful,
     null otherwise
 */
public static String buttom_up_split(String str){
    int len = str.length();
    int[] S = new int[len+1];
    /*Stores all the valid strings*/
    String[] result = new String[len+1];  
    /*Initialize the array*/
    for(int i=0; i <= len; i++){
        S[i] = -1;
    }
    S[0] =0;
    for(int i=0; i < len; i++){
        if(S[i] != -1){
            for(int j= i+1; j <= len; j++){
                String sub = str.substring(i, j);
                int k = j;      
                if(isValidEnglishWord(sub)){
                    S[k] = 1; //set true indicates a valid split
                    /*Add space between words*/
                    if(result[i] != null){ 
                        /*Add the substring to the existing words*/
                        result[i+ sub.length()] = result[i] + " " + sub;
                    }
                    else{
                        /*The first word*/
                        result[i+ sub.length()] = sub;
                    }
                }

            }
        }
    }
    return result[len];  //return the last element of the array
}

I really confused how to convert this buttom_up_version to the memoized version, hope someone can help..

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Well, I'm not an export of memoization, but the idea is to have a "memory" of previous good english words. The objective is to save computation time: in your case, the call to isValidEnglishWord().

Therefore, you need to adapt your alorythm this way:

  1. walk through the 'str' string
  2. extract a substring from it
  3. checkif the substring is a valid word in your memory.
    1. It's in memory: add a space and the word to your result.
    2. It's not in memory: calls isValidEnglishWord and process its return.

It will give something like (not tested nor compiled)

// This is our memory
import java.util.*

private static Map<String, Boolean> memory = new HashMap<String, Boolean>()

public static String buttom_up_split(String str){
   int len = str.length();
   int[] S = new int[len+1];

   String[] result = new String[len+1];  
   for(int i=0; i <= len; i++){
      S[i] = -1;
   }
   S[0] =0;
   for(int i=0; i < len; i++){
      if(S[i] != -1){
         for(int j= i+1; j <= len; j++){
            String sub = str.substring(i, j);
            int k = j;    

            // Order is significant: first look into memory !
            Boolean isInMemory = memory.contains(sub);
            if (isInMemory || isValidEnglishWord(sub)){
                S[k] = 1;
                if(result[i] != null){ 

                    // Memoize the result if needed.
                    if (!isInMemory) {
                        memory.put(sub, true);
                    }

                    result[i+ sub.length()] = result[i] + " " + sub;
                } else {
                    result[i+ sub.length()] = sub;
                }
            }

        }
    }
}
return result[len];

}

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your idea, man. I will try... –  jctank Jun 2 '12 at 7:56

Personally I always prefer to use memoization as transparently as possible without modifying the algorithm. This is because I want to be able to test the algorithm separately from memoization. Also I am working on a memoization library in which you only have to add @Memoize to methods to which memoization is applicable. But unfortunately this will come too late for you.

The last time I used memoization (without my library) I implemented it using a proxy class. An important remark is that this implementation does not support recursion. But this shouldn't be a problem since your algorithm is not recursive.

Some other references are:

Remark about your algorithm: How do you handle words that have other words in them? like "verbose" contains "verb", "theory" contains "the" etc...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.