Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I heard this in a tutorial : "In Object Oriented Programming Languages there are pre-provided classes like strings and arrays in their standard library so that you don't need to define those classes yourselves before defining an object of that type." I have also heard my professor saying "The best data structure for solving this problem is an array". So is it correct regard array as both a class and a data structure as well?

share|improve this question
1  
Comparing a class to a data structure makes no sense. A class must represent a data structure, but a data structure are not necessarily represented by a class. There's simply no comparison between them. –  Dikei Jun 2 '12 at 10:43
add comment

3 Answers

"In Object Oriented Programming Languages there are pre-provided classes like strings and arrays in their standard library so that you don't need to define those classes yourselves before defining an object of that type."

Correct.
C++ Standard Library provides a number of template container classes so one can just use those instead of writing own classes. Since these are template based classes one needs to just use them for their own data type, as long as the type satisfy's some basic requirements laid out for the Standard library containers.
You might want to sneak a peek to what those are: Standard Library Containers

"The best data structure for solving this problem is an array"

Incorrect.
The answer to this depends on:

  • What data you want to store &
  • What operations you want to perform on that data

Good Read:
How can i efficiently select a Standard library container in C++11?

share|improve this answer
1  
OK with the standard library, but, ehm, why do you say the second one is incorrect? Is an array not a data structure, or are you saying the teacher is wrong about how to solve "this problem" (which the OP never mentioned, by the way)? –  Mr Lister Jun 2 '12 at 8:57
    
@MrLister: "The answer to this depends on:..." or am I missing something? –  Alok Save Jun 2 '12 at 8:58
1  
Yes, I mean you don't know what problem the teacher is solving, so you don't know it it's incorrect or not! –  Mr Lister Jun 2 '12 at 8:59
    
@MrLister: Not really in a mood to bite on flame baits or pedantic mood swings on a saturday.So I am just going to say it this once, its clear from the OP's Q that his/her teacher suggests using array is the best possible solution to this problem(of various containers being made available) –  Alok Save Jun 2 '12 at 9:02
    
@Als I also think that you can't say it is Incorrect, you yourself said that depends so saying it is incorrect depends! –  jamylak Jun 2 '12 at 9:17
add comment

In Python, an array is both a class and a data structure.

In C++, an array isn't a class. It's just a contiguous area in memory that contains the element data.

But, you do have std::vector which is a class that wraps up an array. That is a class and a data structure.

share|improve this answer
    
Except for the confusingly named std::array in C++11, which could be considered to be a class template. –  juanchopanza Jun 2 '12 at 11:12
2  
No, an array is not the same thing as a pointer, neither in C nor in C++. See c-faq.com/aryptr for details, but the short version is that arrays are not pointers but are implicitly converted to pointers almost everywhere. –  delnan Jun 2 '12 at 11:37
    
Even in the link you gave me. Section 6.10 .. It's just pointers with overloaded [] operator. –  Yochai Timmer Jun 2 '12 at 13:59
    
@YochaiTimmer Huh? The closest thing to that I can find in Q6.10 is the "second way to think about it", which just states that arrays are second-class citizens. And the whole point of the mention of [] is that it's not overloaded - in the expression arr[i], the array arr is converted into a pointer to the first element of the array, and the [] applies to that pointer. IOW there is no way to subscript an array. As A6.10 states (yet again), "Arrays and pointers are the same" is not a correct mental model. –  delnan Jun 2 '12 at 14:52
add comment

An array is a datatype. It may be implemented as a class in some languages but doesn't have to be. C++ arrays are not classes. Python arrays are implemented as classes.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.