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I am thinking of the best practices of flow control. Which way should I go?

1) Don't check anything and let the program fail (cleaner code, natural error messages):

  def self.fetch(feed_id)
    feed = Feed.find(feed_id)
    feed.fetch
  end

2) Fail silently by returning nil (however, "Clean Code" says, that you should never return null):

  def self.fetch(feed_id)
    return unless feed_id
    feed = Feed.find(feed_id)
    return unless feed
    feed.fetch
  end

3) Throw exceptions (because it's exceptional not to find a feed by id):

  def self.fetch(feed_id)
    raise ArgumentError.new unless feed_id
    feed = Feed.find(feed_id)
    raise ArgumentError.new unless feed
    feed.fetch
  end

To put it in other words: should I be using guard conditions actively, or is it better to rely on Ruby / Rails methods and let them throw an exception, if something wrong happens?

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1  
if this ActiveRecord, a find will blow if the id does not exist, find_by_id does not blow. – tokland Jun 2 '12 at 12:59
up vote 5 down vote accepted

1) Don't check anything and let the program fail (cleaner code, natural error messages):

It's ok to "let the program fail" with known, documented exceptions, but getting an unpleasant NoMethodError because you tried to use a nil object is just careless. In your particular example, ActiveRecord#find raises a documented ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound exception, so IMO this is the way to go:

def self.fetch(feed_id)
  Feed.find(feed_id).fetch
end

2) Fail silently by returning nil (however, "Clean Code" says, that you should never return null):

That's fine as a general advice, but Ruby is crammed with methods that return nil; and that's ok (again, as long as it's documented), it just means "Nothing" (and allows the very compact pattern something_that_can_be_nil || another_value). In this case I'd write it concisely using Ick's maybe:

def self.fetch(feed_id)
  Feed.find_by_id(feed_id).maybe.fetch
end

3) Throw exceptions (because it's exceptional not to find a feed by id):

Yes, but then let the method raise the well-known RecordNotFound exception, not a custom one (unless you want to abstract the fact that you are working with AR, which can be very cumbersome).

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I think the right answer is: it depends. The user theoratically should never encounter any error message from the framework. You must always be prepared to handle these exceptions. The choice is all yours (if it is not an externally used interface or something).

If you take the first route, I think you should fist query that is any feed exist with that id, and then try to fetch it. If the feed disappears bitween the two, that can be a real problem to report. The third is basically the same. You need to make sure, that you handled every situation, and in that throwing exception can help to prevent the user seeing the error.

The second solution is basically this, but with an internal handling. With the nil you signal that there is some problem. It also must be handled, reported to the user, or something. The drawback is if you forget this, you may mislead the user.

I would use the first method, with an extra check before to make sure it exists. But it depends on the usage.

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Yes it depends. If it is a fatal error that the operation must be successful to keep the program going on, let it fail or throw an exception. Otherwise just return nil – texasbruce Jun 2 '12 at 13:06

I would go for the clean version.

If you don't supply a feed_id to the fetch method, ruby itself will raise ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments(0 for 1), so the first part of #3 is pointless.

If you don't supply a valid feed_id, then the Feed.find(feed_id) call will raise a different exception, most likely ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound with a message either saying that it could not find a feed with the supplied ID, or if no ID was supplied (the feed_id parameter was nil), that it could not find a feed without an ID.

To me it seems kind of stupid to call the method with feed_id = nil, so I would probably argue that "if you send invalid input, it might break", and in that case, I think that the ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound will give you much more information about what went wrong than if you raise an ArgumentError.

Returning a null value is seldom a good thing, since that won't tell you what actually went wrong. Therefore, I would also rule out #2.

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