Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was trying to solve the following problem:

Weighted Sum Problem

The closest problem I have done before is Kadane's algorithm, so I tried the "max ending here" approach, which led to the following DP-based program. The idea is to break the problem down into smaller identical problems (the usual DP).

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>


main(){
int i, n, m, C[20002], max, y, x, best, l, j;
int a[20002], b[20002];
scanf("%d %d", &n, &m);
for(i=0;i<n;i++){
    scanf("%d",&C[i]);
}
a[0] = C[0];
max = C[0];
for(i=1;i<n;i++){
    max = (C[i]>max) ? C[i] : max;
    a[i] = max;
}

for(l=0;l<n;l++){
    b[l] = 0;
}

for(y=2;y<m+1;y++){

    for(x=y-1;x<n;x++){

        best = max = 0;
        for(j=0;j<y;j++){
        max += (j+1) * C[j];
        }

        for(i=y-1;i<x+1;i++){
            best = a[i-1] + y * C[i];
            max = (best>max) ? best : max;
        }
        b[x] = max;
    }

    for(l=0;l<n;l++){
    a[l] = b[l];                 
    }
}
printf("%d\n",b[n-1]);
system("PAUSE");
return 0;
}

But this program does not work within the specified time limit (space limit is fine). Please give me a hint on the algorithm to be used on this problem.

EDIT.

Here is the explanation of the code: Like in Kadane's, my idea is to look at a particular C[i], then take the maximum weighted sum for an m-subsequence ending at C[i], and finally take the max of all such values over all i. This will give us our answer. Now note that when you look at an m-subsequence ending at C[i], and take the maximum weighted sum, this is equivalent to taking the maximum weighted sum of an (m-1)-subsequence, contained in C[0] to C[i-1]. And this is a smaller problem which is identical to our original one. So we use recursion. To avoid double calling to functions, we make a table of values f[i][j], where f[i-i][j] is the answer to the problem which is identical to our problem with n replaced by i and m replaced by j. That is, we build a table of f[i][j], and our final answer is f[n-1][m] (that is, we use memoization). Now noting that only the previous column is required to compute an entry f[i][j], it is enough to keep only arrays. Those arrays are 'a' and 'b'.

Sorry for the long length, can't help it. :(

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to StackOverflow! :) I am looking at the example implementation given here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximum_subarray_problem Looks like Kadane's algorithm is linear O(n) and your code is cubic O(n^3). Could you please comment your code so that one can understand better the operations that you are doing? Also, what is the meaning of your variables, like a and b? –  Vitalij Zadneprovskij Jun 2 '12 at 14:43
    
@VitalijZadneprovskij Thank you for your interest. I have added the explanation in the original post. Yes, my algorithm is O(n^3), which is why I think this is not the right line of thought. –  Nihal Pednekar Jun 2 '12 at 17:01

2 Answers 2

Try 0/1 Knapsack without repetition approach where at each step we decide whether to include an item or not.

Let MWS(i, j) represent the optimal maximum weighted sum of the sub-problem C[i...N] where i varies from 0 <= i <= N and 1 <= j <= M, and our goal is to find out the value of MWS(0, 1).

MWS(i, j) can be represented in the recursive ways as follow.

enter image description here

I am leaving the boundary conditions handling as an exercise for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I will try to code this approach tomorrow. Thank you very much. –  Nihal Pednekar Jun 2 '12 at 17:53
    
Actually, this is exactly what was suggested by Dmitri Chubarov. –  Nihal Pednekar Jun 3 '12 at 5:39
    
then its good for you .... now you know both the correct approach and the working code :) –  Ravi Gupta Jun 3 '12 at 11:41

Your general approach is correct. But there is a problem with your algorithm.

You could replace the body of the inner loop

    best = max = 0;
    for(j=0;j<y;j++){
    max += (j+1) * C[j];
    }

    for(i=y-1;i<x+1;i++){
        best = a[i-1] + y * C[i];
        max = (best>max) ? best : max;
    }
    b[x] = max;

with

   b[x] = MAX(b[x-1],a[x-1] + y * C[x]);

This will improve the time complexity of the algorithm. I.e. avoid recomputing b[i] for all i < x. A common trait in dynamic programming.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, that code was unnecessary. :) (a[x] should be a[x-1]. I tried to edit it, but the edit is too small, so it wouldn't let me.) –  Nihal Pednekar Jun 2 '12 at 17:51
    
Yes, indeed, a[x-1] it should be. –  Dmitri Chubarov Jun 2 '12 at 17:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.