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Say that I have an array as follows:

array(
    [0] => function() { return "hello"; }
    [1] => function() { return "world"; }
    [2] => "look"
    [3] => function() { return "and";}
    [4] => function() { return "listen";}
)

Is there a way I can invoke 0, 1, 3 and 4 without invoking 2?

share|improve this question
7  
instanceof Closure && is_callable() –  jolt Jun 2 '12 at 11:32
    
Shouldn't this be an answer? –  elite5472 Jun 2 '12 at 11:33
    
Wrote from phone, didn't want to do the formatting part. SO isn't mobile friendly. :( –  jolt Jun 2 '12 at 15:43
    
Ah, too bad. Could have been best answer :) –  elite5472 Jun 3 '12 at 10:25
    
I can make it an answer, but ThiefMaster has already it explained in detail. Why don't you accept his one? –  jolt Jun 4 '12 at 6:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Anonymous functions are instances of the Closure class. So checking that and is_callable does the job.

foreach ($array as $func) {
    if (is_callable($func) && $func instanceof Closure) {
        $func();
    }
}

Actually, the class check should be enough since you cannot instantiate Closure objects manually except by creating an anonymous function.

share|improve this answer
    
This works great. –  elite5472 Jun 2 '12 at 11:50
    
@elite5472 did you test it? it should cause a fatal error if "look" is defined as a function because it will lead to testing "look" instanceof Closure which causes a fatal error. Lols, nevermind, that's just if you test a string directly instead of a variable containing a string... :D –  Esailija Jun 2 '12 at 11:58
    
Esailija, no, it leads to testing $func instanceof Closure which is valid: $func = 'look'; var_dump($func instanceof Closure); => bool(false) –  Emil Vikström Jun 2 '12 at 12:01
    
@EmilVikström yep, see my edit, a huge wtf :P –  Esailija Jun 2 '12 at 12:01
1  
That's not a WTF. From the manual: "instanceof is used to determine whether a PHP variable is an instantiated object of a certain class". –  Emil Vikström Jun 2 '12 at 12:02

I think this is what you want. $result will be an array of the return value of each function call (except if it's not an anonymous function, in which case it will be the original value from $array).

$result = array_map(
                    function($e) {
                      return ($e instanceof Closure && is_callable($e)) ?
                        $e() : $e;
                    }, $array);
share|improve this answer

You can use reflection, it has an undocument function to check for closures; try this (haven't tested):

foreach ($array as $val) {
    $re = newReflectionFunction($val);
    if ($re->isClosure()) {
        $val();
        // do whatever you want
    }
}

...or check whether it isn't a string/numeric:

foreach ($array as $val) {
    if (!is_string($val) && !is_numeric($val)) {
        $val();
        // do whatever you want
    }
}

...or check whether it's an object:

foreach ($array as $val) {
    if (gettype($val) == 'object') {
        $val();
        // do whatever you want
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is not very useful. What if it's not a string? –  elite5472 Jun 2 '12 at 11:35
    
In your case it is, so I was assuming it was either an anonymous function or a string. –  Jeroen Jun 2 '12 at 11:36
1  
elite5472, that's not what you asked. From your question, a just as useful answer would be if ($val !== 'look') ... –  Emil Vikström Jun 2 '12 at 11:38
    
I've added an alternative –  Jeroen Jun 2 '12 at 11:39
    
@EmilVikström what if it changes dynamically? –  Leri Jun 2 '12 at 11:39

gettype on anon methods return "object" and is_callable() returns true on functions, then:

foreach ($array as $val) {
    if (is_callable($val) && gettype($val)=="object") {
        $val();
    }
}

and here's my test code:

<?php 

function look(){
    return "looking";
}

$data=array(
    0 => function() { return "hello"; },
    1 => function() { return "world"; },
    2 => "look",
    3 => function() { return "and";},
    4 => function() { return "listen";}
);
echo "<pre>";

foreach ($data as $val) {
    if (is_callable($val) && gettype($val)=="object") {
        echo $val();
    }
}

?>
share|improve this answer
    
What if look() is a defined function? –  Emil Vikström Jun 2 '12 at 11:37
    
I updated my answer. –  Taha Paksu Jun 2 '12 at 11:41
    
THis isn't correct, because __invoke() exists and so any user defined object can be made callable. –  goat Jun 2 '12 at 15:02
    
Where is __invoke() in the question? Can string have __invoke()? In this case, this solution works. And thanks for the downvote. –  Taha Paksu Jun 2 '12 at 17:47

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