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Consider the following case:

public class A {
  public A() { b = new B(); }
  B b;
  private class B { }
}

From a warning in Eclipse I quote that: the java complier emulates the constructor A.B() by a synthetic accessor method. I suppose the compiler now goes ahead and creates an extra "under water" constructor for B.

I feel this is rather strange: why would class B not be visible as a.k.o. field in A? And: does it mean that class B is no longer private at run time? And: why behaves the protected keyword for class B different?

public class A {
  public A() { b = new B(); }
  B b;
  protected class B { }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Inner classes are essentially a hack introduced in Java 1.1. The JVM doesn't actually have any concept of an inner class, and so the compiler has to bodge it. The compiler generates class B "outside" of class A, but in the same package, and then adds synthetic accessors/constructors to it to allow A to get access to it.

When you give B a protected constructor, A can access that constructor since it's in the same package, without needing a synthetic constructor to be added.

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1  
+1 very good response –  dfa Jul 6 '09 at 10:00
    
OK, I see it. For me this means I will avoid the use of inner classes like in the example, it can only lead to confusion. –  Gerard Jul 6 '09 at 10:10
2  
I wouldn't let it bother you. That particular compiler warning isn't really much use to anyone, synthetic methods are used all the time with inner classes, and have no significant impact. –  skaffman Jul 6 '09 at 10:15
    
IMHO the synthetic methods were an unnecessary addition to the language. Just using package scope for the "private" members (which the compiler does under the hood anyway) was a satisfactory solution. –  finnw Jul 6 '09 at 10:22
2  
but the members are still "private" for the other classes in the package... –  Carlos Heuberger Jul 6 '09 at 13:22

The access of class B and its constructor do not have to be the same. You can have a private inner class with a package-scope constructor, and this is what I usually do.

public class A {
  public A() { b = new B(); }
  B b;
  private class B {
    B() { }
  }
}
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But how can you have a package-private instance of a properly private class? –  einpoklum Apr 16 '13 at 15:59

I know this question is now almost three years old, but I find that a part of the question is still not answered:

And: does it mean that class B is no longer private at run time?

Carlos Heubergers comment on skaffmans answer suggests, class B is still private for other classes in the package.

He is probably right for the Java programming language, i.e. it is not possible to refer to class B from an other class. At least not without using reflection (with which also private class members may be accessed from the outside), but this is another issue.

But as the JVM does not have any concept of an inner class (as skaffman states), I asked myself how an "accessible by only one class" visibility is realized at the bytecode level. The answer: It isn't realized at all, for the JVM the inner class looks like a normal package private class. This is, if you write bytecode for yourself (or modify one generated by the compiler) you can access class B without problems.

You can access all synthetic accessor methods from all classes in the same package, too. So if you assign a value to a private field of class A in a method of class B, a synthetic accessor method with default (i.e. package private) visibility is generated in class A (named something like access$000) that sets the value for you. This method is supposed to only be called from class B (and indeed it can only be called from there using the Java language). But from the JVMs point of view, this is just a method as any other and can be called by any class.

So, to answer the question:

  • From the Java languages point of view, class B is and stays private.
  • From the JVMs point of view, class B (or better: class A$B) is not private.
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correct, but that is not what I suggested. I wrote "the members are still private" - I meant the fields of the class and not the class itself as interpreted by you! Also this question is about java and not bytecode (generation, modification, hacking ...). –  Carlos Heuberger May 21 '12 at 10:22
    
@CarlosHeuberger of course this was no offense to you! Certainly the members of class B are still private, but class B (as sort of a member of class A) is not (from the JVMs point of view), and this was the original question by Gerard. And yes, the question is about java, but as stated in the tag wiki: "Java is a programming language and runtime environment". And the runtime environment is the JVM and the JVM per se has nothing to do with the Java programming language but only interprets bytecode. –  siegi May 26 '12 at 10:12

You need to use

this.new B();
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sorry, but this.new B(); gives the same warning and behaviour. –  Gerard Jul 6 '09 at 10:02
2  
@Rats: that will make no difference to the problem in hand. The "this" qualification is implicit. –  skaffman Jul 6 '09 at 10:03

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