Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
[Serializable]
public abstract class A
{
    public A()
    {

    }
}

[Serializable]
public class B : A
{
    public B() : base()
    {

    }
}

In an extension:

public static T NextRecord<T>(this SqlDataReader reader) where T : A, new()
{
    // Do work
}

I call this extension like so:

B b = reader.NextRecord<B>();

Yet, I get this exception: "There is no implicit reference conversion from 'B' to 'A'."

What am I doing wrong?

Thanks.

Edit

public static T NextRecord<T>(this SqlDataReader reader) where T : A, new()
{
    // Make sure we have been given a correct Type
    if (!typeof(T).BaseType.Equals(typeof(A)))
    {
        throw new Exception("Supplied Type is not derived from Type A");
    }

    if (reader.IsNull())
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("reader is null");
    }

    if (reader.HasRows)
    {
        if (reader.Read())
        {
            // Instance a object of the type, passing it the SqlDataReader so that it can populate itself   
            return Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), new object[] { reader }) as T;
        }
    }

    return null;
}

Here's the code for the extension

share|improve this question
3  
Your code works for me. Are you sure you're not confusing different types with the same name or something like that? Could you post a short but complete example program that exhibits this error? –  svick Jun 2 '12 at 13:44
    
This mean there is a problem in implementation of the extension method. Show extension method. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Jun 2 '12 at 13:49
    
Added the extension code –  Metalstorm Jun 2 '12 at 15:09
2  
I know this isn't a part of your question, but you don't need to check if T is of type A. Your constraint for the generic will take care of that at compile time. –  Jim D'Angelo Jun 2 '12 at 15:13
2  
Your typeof check at the beginning is redundant due to the generic constraint, but will also fail if T is not directly derived from A which is probably not what you want. The new() constraint is also odd if you're going to look for a non-default constructor in the method. –  Lee Jun 2 '12 at 15:16

1 Answer 1

Still having problems with this, although i sort of fixed the problem by changing where T : A to where T : class.

I have a 2nd problem:

public class SomeOtherClass
{
    public static void Test(SomeClassBase obj)
    {

    }
}

public abstract class SomeClassBase
{
    public SomeClassBase()
    {
        SomeOtherClass.Test(this);
    }
}

public class SomeClass : SomeClassBase
{
    public SomeClass() : base()
    {

    }
}

I Get this exception:

"The best overloaded method match for 'Namespace.SomeOtherClass.Test(Namespace.SomeClass)' has some invalid arguments"

However, removing the mothod call from the ctor and calling it outside will work, like so:

SomeClass s = new SomeClass(); SomeOtherClass.Test(s);

Even changing the method to:

public static void Test(SomeClass obj)
{

}

will fail :(

and if i move the method call to the derived class ctor...

share|improve this answer
    
I ran the above code in a separate solution and it worked... but it's basically exactly the same (method/class signatures, etc) as the real code.. just all the logic stripped out –  Metalstorm Jun 20 '12 at 23:37
    
Fixed my second problem! :) .. I moved the classes out of a file that had its build action set to 'Content' (as it was a page) into a normal .cs file with the build action set to 'Compile'..It broke one of my extensions oddly so i'm having to fix that now :/ –  Metalstorm Jun 20 '12 at 23:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.