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I have a view that returns a pdf (using iTextSharp) with multiple pages, but now I have to change it so that each page is a separate pdf (with it's own unique title) and return a zip file.

My original code looks like this:

public FileStreamResult DownloadPDF()
{
    MemoryStream workStream = new MemoryStream();
    Document document = new Document();
    PdfWriter.GetInstance(document, workStream).CloseStream = false;
    document.Open();

    // Populate pdf items

    document.Close();

    byte[] byteInfo = workStream.ToArray();
    workStream.Write(byteInfo, 0, byteInfo.Length);
    workStream.Position = 0;

    FileStreamResult fileResult = new FileStreamResult(workStream, "application/pdf");
    fileResult.FileDownloadName = "fileName";

    return fileResult;
}

It looks pretty simple to compress a file with gzip, but I don't know how to gzip multiple files and return it as one zip file. Or should I use something other than gzip, like dotnetzip or sharpzip?

Thanks in advance!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If your solution works then the easiest thing to do is to just keep it, as is.

On the other hand I do have some comments about your usage of the DoTNetZip library.

First, your code is sort of misguided. In this section:

byte[] byteInfo = workStream.ToArray();                        

zip.Save(workStream);                        

workStream.Write(byteInfo, 0, byteInfo.Length);                        
workStream.Position = 0;                        

...you are reading the workStream into an array. But at that point, you haven't written anything to workStream, so the array is empty, zero-length. Then you save the zip into the workstream. Then you write the array (of zero length) into the same workstream. This is a NO-OP. Finally you reset the position.

You could replace all of that with :

zip.Save(workStream);                        
workStream.Position = 0;                        

This isn't an issue with DotNetZip per se, it's just an mis-understanding on your part regarding the operation of streams.

OK, Next, you are allocating temporary buffers (memorystreams) unnecessarily. Think of a MemoryStream as just an array of bytes, with a Stream wrapper on it, to support Write(), Read(), Seek(), and so on. Essentially your code is writing data into that temporary buffer, then telling DotNetZip to read the data from the temp buffer into its own buffer for compression. You don't need that interim buffer. It works the way you've done it, but it could be more efficient.

DotNetZip has an AddEntry() overload that accepts a writer delegate. The delegate is a function that DotNetZip calls to tell your app to write the entry content into the zip archive. Your code writes uncompressed bytes, and DotNetZip compresses and writes them to the output stream.

In that writer delegate, your code writes directly into the DotNetZip stream - the stream that is passed into the delegate by DotNetZip. There's no intervening buffer. Nice for efficiency.

Keep in mind the rules about closures. If you call this writer delegate in a for loop, you need to have a way of retrieving the "bla" corresponding to the zipentry within the delegate. The delegate does not get executed until zip.Save() is called! So you cannot rely on the value of 'bla' from the loop.

public FileStreamResult DownloadPDF() 
{ 
    MemoryStream workStream = new MemoryStream(); 
    using(var zip = new ZipFile()) 
    {
        foreach(Bla bla in Blas) 
        { 
            zip.AddEntry(bla.filename + ".pdf", (name,stream) => {
                    var thisBla = GetBlaFromName(name);
                    Document document = new Document(); 
                    PdfWriter.GetInstance(document, stream).CloseStream = false; 

                    document.Open(); 

                    // write PDF Content for thisBla into stream/PdfWriter 

                    document.Close(); 
                });
        } 

        zip.Save(workStream); 
    }
    workStream.Position = 0; 

    FileStreamResult fileResult = new FileStreamResult(workStream, System.Net.Mime.MediaTypeNames.Application.Zip); 
    fileResult.FileDownloadName = "MultiplePDFs.zip"; 

    return fileResult; 
}

Finally, I don't particularly like your creation of a FileStreamResult from a MemoryStream. The problem is your entire zip file is kept in memory, which can be very hard on memory usage. If your zip files are large, your code will retain all of the content in memory.

I don't know enough about the MVC3 model to know if there is something in it that helps with this. If there is not, you can use an Anonymous Pipe to invert the direction of the streams, and eliminate the need to hold all the compressed data in memory.

Here's what I mean: creating a FileStreamResult requires that you provide a readable stream. If you use a MemoryStream, in order to make it readable, you need to write to it first, then seek back to position 0, before passing it to the FileStreamResult constructor. This means all the content for that zip file has to be held in memory contiguously at some point in time.

Suppose you could provide a readable stream to the FileStreamResult constructor, that would allow the reader to read at exactly the moment you wrote to it. This is what an anonymous pipe stream does. It allows your code to use a writeable stream, while the MVC code gets its readable stream.

Here's what it would look like in code.

static Stream GetPipedStream(Action<Stream> writeAction) 
{ 
    AnonymousPipeServerStream pipeServer = new AnonymousPipeServerStream(); 
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(s => 
    { 
        using (pipeServer) 
        { 
            writeAction(pipeServer); 
            pipeServer.WaitForPipeDrain(); 
        } 
    }); 
    return new AnonymousPipeClientStream(pipeServer.GetClientHandleAsString()); 
} 


public FileStreamResult DownloadPDF() 
{
    var readable = 
        GetPipedStream(output => { 

            using(var zip = new ZipFile()) 
            {
                foreach(Bla bla in Blas) 
                { 
                    zip.AddEntry(bla.filename + ".pdf", (name,stream) => {
                        var thisBla = GetBlaFromName(name);
                        Document document = new Document(); 
                        PdfWriter.GetInstance(document, stream).CloseStream = false; 

                        document.Open(); 

                        // write PDF Content for thisBla to PdfWriter

                        document.Close(); 
                    });
                } 

                zip.Save(output); 
            }
        }); 

    var fileResult = new FileStreamResult(readable, System.Net.Mime.MediaTypeNames.Application.Zip); 
    fileResult.FileDownloadName = "MultiplePDFs.zip"; 

    return fileResult; 
}

I haven't tried this but it ought to work. This has an advantage over what you wrote, of being more memory efficient. The disadvantage is that it is quite a bit more complex, using named pipes and several anonymous functions.

This makes sense only if the zip content is into the >1MB range. If your zips are smaller than that, then you can just do it the first way I've shown, above.


Addendum

Why can you not rely on the value of bla within the anonymous method?

There are two key points. First, the foreach loop defines a variable named bla, which takes a different value, each time through the loop. Seems obvious but it's worth stating it explicitly.

Second, the anonymous method is being passed as an argument to the ZipFile.AddEntry() method, and it won't run at the time the foreach loop runs. In fact the anonymous method gets called repeatedly, once for each entry added, at the time of ZipFile.Save(). If you refer to bla within the anonymous method, it gets the last value assigned to bla, because that is the value bla holds at the time ZipFile.Save() runs.

It's the deferred execution that causes the difficulty.

What you want is each distinct value of bla from the foreach loop to be accessible at the time the anonymous function is invoked - later, outside the foreach loop. You could do this with a utility method (GetBlaForName()), like I showed above. You can also do this with an additional closure, like so:

Action<String,Stream> GetEntryWriter(Bla bla)
{
   return new Action<String,Stream>((name,stream) => {
     Document document = new Document();  
     PdfWriter.GetInstance(document, stream).CloseStream = false;  

     document.Open();  

     // write PDF Content for bla to PdfWriter 

     document.Close();  
  };
}

foreach(var bla in Blas)
{
  zip.AddEntry(bla.filename + ".pdf", GetEntryWriter(bla));
}

The GetEntryWriter returns a method - actually an Action, which is just a typed method. Each time through the loop, a new instance of that Action is created, and it references a different value for bla. That Action is not called until the time of ZipFile.Save().

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thanks you gave a great breakdown and efficient code! Can you expand a bit more on why I can't rely on the value of 'bla' from the loop. –  Garrett Fogerlie Jun 5 '12 at 4:34
    
yep, I put the explanation at the end of the answer above. If you wanna know more about that, you should read up on closures. stackoverflow.com/a/428624/48082 –  Cheeso Jun 5 '12 at 8:19
    
Thanks a ton! I really appreciate the detailed level of your answer! –  Garrett Fogerlie Jun 5 '12 at 8:27
    
no problemo, glad to help. good luck. –  Cheeso Jun 5 '12 at 8:29
    
+1 - Nice to see such a detailed explanation from one of the DotNetZip developers. Awesome library. :) –  kuujinbo Jun 5 '12 at 9:12

As Turnkey said - SharpZipLib is pretty good with mulitple files and memory stream. Simply foreach files you need to compress and add them to archive. Here is example:

        // Save it to memory
        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
        ZipOutputStream zipStream = new ZipOutputStream(ms);

        // USE THIS TO CHECK ZIP :)
        //FileStream fileOut = File.OpenWrite(@"c:\\test1.zip");
        //ZipOutputStream zipStream = new ZipOutputStream(fileOut);

        zipStream.SetLevel(0);

        // Loop your pages (files)
        foreach(string filename in files)
        {
            // Create and name entry in archive
            FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(filename);
            ZipEntry zipEntry = new ZipEntry(fi.Name);
            zipStream.PutNextEntry(zipEntry);

            // Put entry to archive (from file or DB)
            ReadFileToZip(zipStream, filename);

            zipStream.CloseEntry();

        }

        // Copy from memory to file or to send output to browser, as you did
        zipStream.Close();

I don't know how you get information to be ziped, so I assume that file is ok :)

    /// <summary>
    /// Reads file and puts it to ZIP stream
    /// </summary>
    private void ReadFileToZip(ZipOutputStream zipStream, string filename)
    {
        // Simple file reading :)
        using(FileStream fs = File.OpenRead(filename))
        {
            StreamUtils.Copy(fs, zipStream, new byte[4096]);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

I ended up using DotNetZip instead of SharpZipLib because the solution is simpler. Here is what I ended up doing, it works fine, however if anyone has any advice/changes I'd be happy to here them.

public FileStreamResult DownloadPDF()
{
    MemoryStream workStream = new MemoryStream();
    ZipFile zip = new ZipFile();

    foreach(Bla bla in Blas)
    {
        MemoryStream pdfStream = new MemoryStream();
        Document document = new Document();
        PdfWriter.GetInstance(document, pdfStream).CloseStream = false;

        document.Open();

        // PDF Content

        document.Close();
        byte[] pdfByteInfo = pdfStream.ToArray();
        zip.AddEntry(bla.filename + ".pdf", pdfByteInfo);
        pdfStream.Close();
    }

    zip.Save(workStream);
    workStream.Position = 0;

    FileStreamResult fileResult = new FileStreamResult(workStream, System.Net.Mime.MediaTypeNames.Application.Zip);
    fileResult.FileDownloadName = "MultiplePDFs.zip";

    return fileResult;
}
share|improve this answer
    
my comments were too big for a comment, so I put them in an answer. stackoverflow.com/a/10891136/48082 –  Cheeso Jun 5 '12 at 3:21
    
how do u get blas? wha is it –  Beginner Jun 13 '12 at 14:10
    
Bla and Blas is just made up for the post. This is the content you want in your pdf. In my case it was a model in the database, but it can be strings or whatever. –  Garrett Fogerlie Jun 14 '12 at 8:36

I would recommend using SharpZipLib to zip into a standard zip file. Put the files into a temp folder and use the FastZip class to make the zip.

share|improve this answer
    
Due to constraints on this project, I cannot create files and store them, even temporarily, in a folder. I need to dynamically create the files in memory and return it/them as a file stream. –  Garrett Fogerlie Jun 2 '12 at 14:02
    
I see, SharpZipLib does support streaming but I haven't used it for inputs. Should be able to do it though using their basic classes. –  Turnkey Jun 2 '12 at 14:07

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