Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sorry for the title and question but I don't know how it is called (and how to google) if I want to find out with how many times I can build a number from a group of numbers:

possible_numbers = 1, 2, 4, 8, 16

If I want number 23 I need

1x 16
0x 8
1x 4
1x 2
1x 1 

Is there any build in function in Python to do this?

Thank you in advance!

Edit: The numbers are fixed to 1,2,4,8,16,32,64,128. Multiple selections are possible. Thanks for the replies!

Since there is no build in function, I'll code it myself.

share|improve this question
1  
Is 23x 1 also a valid output? –  robert Jun 2 '12 at 13:57
    
added factorization –  Junuxx Jun 2 '12 at 14:11
    
@Junuxx: this isn't really about factorization, it's about finding an integer partition with a restricted summand set. –  DSM Jun 2 '12 at 14:13
2  
I think this is actually a coin change problem, regardless of whether the original poster was thinking in those terms. –  robert Jun 2 '12 at 14:14
1  
No, the numbers are limited to 1,2,4,8,16,32,64,128 @DSM exactly, that's it I have to read about coin change –  snowflake Jun 2 '12 at 14:41
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Assuming that the possible numbers are always powers of two, you basically want to convert the number to binary format. This is easy with the built-in bin function:

>>> mylist = [int(x) for x in bin(23)[2:]]
>>> print mylist
[1, 0, 1, 1, 1]

To get the output exactly like you showed in your question:

>>> for i, j in enumerate(mylist):
...     print '%ix %i' % (j, 2**(len(mylist)-i-1))
...
1x 16
0x 8
1x 4
1x 2
1x 1
share|improve this answer
2  
.... That's a cute solution. –  Jakob Bowyer Jun 2 '12 at 13:52
    
That's a clever solution! –  snowflake Jun 2 '12 at 14:44
add comment

Assuming your numbers are not limited to powers of two, this solution should work. It is definitely not polished or efficient, but it works.

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys

def factors(desired, numbers):
    if desired == 0:
        return []
    elif desired < 0:
        return None

    for number in sorted(numbers, reverse=True):
        f = factors(desired - number, numbers)
        if f is not None:
            f.append(number)
            return f


if __name__ == "__main__":
    n = int(sys.argv[1])
    possibles = map(int, sys.argv[2].split())
    f = factors(n, possibles)
    print f

    for i in sorted(possibles, reverse=True):
        print "{0}x {1}".format(f.count(i), i)

Here are some examples:

$ python test.py 23 "1 2 4 8 16"
[1, 2, 4, 16]
1x 16
0x 8
1x 4
1x 2
1x 1

$ python test.py 23 "1 2 5 8 16"
[2, 5, 16]
1x 16
0x 8
1x 5
1x 2
0x 1

$ python test.py 23 "1 2 3 8 16"
[1, 3, 3, 16]
1x 16
0x 8
2x 3
0x 2
1x 1

$ python test.py 23 "1 2 3 8 17"
[3, 3, 17]
1x 17
0x 8
2x 3
0x 2
0x 1
share|improve this answer
3  
Nice generalization, +1. Instead of reversed(sorted(possibles)), maybe use sorted(possibles, reverse=True) to get a descending list independent of the order of the input. –  Junuxx Jun 2 '12 at 14:08
    
@Junuxx I made that change. Thanks. –  robert Jun 2 '12 at 14:10
    
will it work for python test.py 23 "1 2 3 8 17" –  shiva Jun 2 '12 at 14:11
1  
@shiva yes, and I added your example to my answer –  robert Jun 2 '12 at 14:12
add comment

If repetition is not allowed, there's a neat way using powersets (and a nice powerset function cribbed from http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Power_set#Python ):

def list_powerset(lst):
    return reduce(lambda result, x: result + [subset + [x] for subset in result], lst, [[]])

def powerset(s):
    return frozenset(map(frozenset, list_powerset(list(s))))

def valid_combos(num, lst):
    return filter(lambda x: sum(x) == num, powerset(lst))

This only works if the numbers only show up once, but I still think it's a fun solution. :)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.