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I am having trouble properly typing in Scala -- I want to do something like this, imposing Ordered on a class hierarchy, but with the subclasses allowing the compare method to only work with parameters of their own type

abstract class Parent extends Ordered
class A extends Parent {
  override def compare(that : A) = 1
}
class B extends Parent {
  override def compare(that : B) = 1
}

The following works, but then I am forced, forever, to impose type specificity on Parent and its subclasses forever. This just becomes a nightmare to reason about correctly.

abstract class Parent[T <: Parent[_]] extends Ordered[T]
class A extends Parent[A] {
  override def compare(that : A) = 1
}
class B extends Parent[A] {
  override def compare(that : B) = 1
}

Is there a simpler method to mandate a type on subclasses of Ordered[T] ?

share|improve this question
    
If we had ThisType you'd perhaps have been able to write abstract class Parent { this: Ordered[ThisType] => /* */ }. –  missingfaktor Jun 2 '12 at 14:46
1  
If objects of (non-generic) class A admits comparison with other objects of class A, then, by definition, objects of all subclasses of A admit comparison with objects of class A, and not just with their own kind. –  n.m. Jun 2 '12 at 16:01
    
You don't want a subclass. A subclass has every capability that the parent has and more. (This is the "Liskov substitution principle" at work.) Any design that relies upon doing this backwards is likely to be full of problems--it certainly is not theoretically sound. –  Rex Kerr Jun 2 '12 at 18:25

4 Answers 4

I agree this problem is a bit annoying, but it would be a little strange if the behavior you're looking for was allowed. Supposing you did

trait Parent {
    this: Ordered[ThisType]
}

// Does A need to be Ordered[A]?
trait A extends Parent

// Should B, C be comparable? If A is Ordered, then they
// have to be. But is this what you want?
class B extends A
class C extends A

// Now what?
class D extends B

Basically, it would be a little odd to use inheritance to force some property like this... it could probably be made to work in theory, but it would be a departure from what inheritance is meant for. Instead, you could specify the Ordered constraint in methods when you need it:

def foo[T <: Ordered[T]](x: T) = ...

Or, if you want to group the Ordered constraint and possible others under a common name, you could make a typeclass-style trait:

trait Parent[A] {
    val order: Ordering[A]
}

def foo[T : Parent](x: T, y: T) {
    println(implicitly[Parent[T]].order.compare(x, y))
}

An unfortunate aspect of this solution is that you cannot specify sealed; I'd be interested if anyone has a way around that. Otherwise, you could use a dependently typed programming language, they're a little better at this sort of thing.

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Why not just

abstract class Parent
class A extends Parent with Ordered[A] {...}
class B extends Parent with Ordered[B] {...}

As others have pointed out, according to your comparison criteria, a sequence of Parents would not be ordered, because its subclasses are not comparable. Only its subclasses are Ordered, so implement the trait there.

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Luigi, I think that is the right answer. I think I am approaching this from a Java OO paradigm, where it is common to have a need to order a group of Parents without knowledge of their underlying type. At least in my little setting, it is beginning to dawn on me that if I set up my functional approach correctly, I will know the type of the collection.

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Thanks that's a very good insight --- never thought about that before. I just lit on this as a solution but frankly it seems a little smelly and it makes me a little nervous. Comments?

abstract class Parent extends Ordered[Parent] {
  override def compare(that : Parent) : Int = {
    (this, that) match {
      case (x : A, y : A) =>  x.compare(y)
      case (x : B, y : B) =>  x.compare(y)
      case _ =>  throw new ClassCastException
    }
  }
}
class A extends Parent {
  def compare(that : A) = 1
}
class B extends Parent {
  def compare(that : B) = 1
}
share|improve this answer
    
That would work, though you lose the ability to check that it's safe at compile time. That's a lot to lose, IMO. –  Owen Jun 2 '12 at 17:12
    
Though, in terms of the structure of your code, it's not atypical for functional programming; whether it's good or not I'm not sure. It's just you lose type safety, which isn't so great. –  Owen Jun 2 '12 at 17:39

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