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The book says:

The decorator pattern can be used to extend (decorate) the functionality of a certain object

I have a rabbit animal. And I want my rabbit to have, for example, reptile skin. Just want to decorate a common rabbit with reptile skin.

I have the code. First I have abstract class Animal with everythig that is common to any animal:

abstract class Animal {
    abstract public function setSleep($hours);
    abstract public function setEat($food);
    abstract public function getSkinType();

    /* and more methods which for sure will be implemented in any concrete animal */
} 

I create class for my rabbit:

class Rabbit extends Animal {
    private $rest;
    private $stomach;
    private $skinType = "hair";

    public function setSleep($hours) {
        $this->rest    = $hours;
    }

    public function setFood($food) {
        $this->stomach = $food;
    }

    public function getSkinType() {
        return $this->$skinType;
    }

}

Up to now everything is OK. Then I create abstract AnimalDecorator class which extends Animal:

abstract class AnimalDecorator extends Animal {
    protected $animal;

    public function __construct(Animal $animal) {
        $this->animal = $animal;
    }
}

And here the problem comes. Pay attention that AnimalDecorator also gets all the abstract methods from the Animal class (in this example just two but in real can have many more).

Then I create concrete ReptileSkinDecorator class which extends AnimalDecorator. It also has those the same two abstract methods from Animal:

class ReptileSkinDecorator extends AnimalDecorator {
    public function getSkinColor() {
        $skin = $this->animal->getSkinType();
        $skin = "reptile";
        return $skin;
    }
}

And finaly I want to decorate my rabbit with reptile skin:

$reptileSkinRabbit = ReptileSkinDecorator(new Rabbit());

But I can't do this because I have two abstract methods in ReptileSkinDecorator class. They are:

abstract public function setSleep($hours);
abstract public function setEat($food);

So, instead of just re-decorating only skin I also have to re-decorate setSleep() and setEat(); methods. But I don't need to.

In all the book examples there is always ONLY ONE abstract method in Animal class. And of course it works then. But here I just made very simple real life example and tried to use the Decorator pattern and it doesn't work without implementing those abstract methods in ReptileSkinDecorator class.

It means that if I want to use my example I have to create a brand new rabbit and implement for it its own setSleep() and setEat() methods. OK, let it be. But then this brand new rabbit has the instance of commont Rabbit I passed to ReptileSkinDecorator:

$reptileSkinRabbit = ReptileSkinDecorator(new Rabbit());

I have one common rabbit instance with its own methods in the reptileSkinRabbit instance which in its turn has its own reptileSkinRabbit methods. I have rabbit in rabbit. But I think I don't have to have such possibility.

I don't understand the Decarator pattern right way. Kindly ask you to point on any mistakes in my example, in my understanding of this pattern.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Can you please say which book? –  hakre Jun 2 '12 at 23:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Sounds like you're trying to force the use of a particular pattern that doesnt fit the problem. A decorator usually aggregates something additional (add braids to the hair), instead of completely changing it, like you're trying to do with the skin (hair to scales).

A Builder pattern, (whereby you specify how you want the object built) may fit the problem better. In your case, you want to build a rabbit built with a reptile skin. (where Im from, instead of reptile skin, it would have been funny to make a rabbit with horns and call it a jackalope :)

I think the use of a Builder (or any pattern) here may actually be overkill. Do you absolutely have to use a pattern for this particular problem? How about just defining the code as follows and leave patterns out of it for now:

class Animal {
    private $rest;
    private $stomach;
    private $skinType;

    public function setSleep($hours) {
        $this->rest    = $hours;
    }

    public function setFood($food) {
        $this->stomach = $food;
    }

    public function setSkinType($skin) {
        $this->skinType = $skin;
    }

    // define the other getters too

    public function getSkinType() {
        return $this->$skinType;
    }
}

class Rabbit extends Animal {
    public function __construct() {
        $this->rest = "rabbitRest";        // put whatever a rabbit rest is
        $this->stomach = "rabbitStomach";  // put whatever a rabbit stomach is
        $this->skinType = "hair";
    }
}

Disclaimer: Im a c++ guy and my php is really bad, Im sure this code has several problems, but I hope you get the idea.

So a Rabbit would just extend an Animal and set its properties accordingly. Then if somebody wanted a RabbitReptile, they could either extend Rabbit (probably overkill) or just make a Rabbit and set the skin type accordingly.

share|improve this answer
    
Simplicity. Great. I want to give +1 but I'm out of votes :/. But keep it simple is cool. Your PHP code looks perfectly alright btw. –  hakre Jun 2 '12 at 23:26
    
@hakre, its ok, we'll take credit for tomorrow :) just kidding –  Brady Jun 3 '12 at 11:52
    
no you're right, thanks for the reminder. I think your answer is really thoughful, gives good inspiration. Keep up the good posts ;) –  hakre Jun 3 '12 at 11:55
    
@hakre, thanks, I was just kidding, but I appreciate it though. I think you might owe Mark M a vote too :) –  Brady Jun 3 '12 at 12:36

The Decorator pattern must delegate all members defined in its base class or implemented interface to the object it is extending. In other words the ReptileSkinDecorator's setSleep, setEat, and getSkinType methods must call the Rabbit's (or whatever other Animal descendant you choose to decorate with reptile skin) setSleep and setEat methods.

Also, I just noticed that in your example you are trying to alter the use of a method defined in the Animal base class (trying to define a skin type, which I assume you want to be immutable). You shouldn't really do that (hide object's immutable properties) with a Decorator pattern, because if the object were to be available outside of the scope of the decorator it would provide a different skin type (as you've defined it). Decorators don't generally change existing properties of the object they're decorating.

Perhaps a better example would be a HibernationDecorator. Since your base class has nothing related to hibernation you may want to make that decorator so that you can provide hibernation functionality for your rabbit. That is what Decorator is about - providing additional functionality not present in the base class or interface contract while still adhering to the base class' contract.

share|improve this answer
    
Can't upvote anylonger today, that's better worded what I tried to describe in code in my answer. So literally +1. –  hakre Jun 2 '12 at 16:32
    
+1 I think the real problem here is that he's trying to force the use of a particular pattern that doesnt fit the problem. –  Brady Jun 2 '12 at 20:31
    
I took it that OP's example was just an attempt to find a way to use the pattern. Given that Green didn't understand the purpose of the pattern it wouldn't be entirely surprising that the example chosen wasn't really suitable for the pattern. Just my interpretation though, –  Mark M Jun 3 '12 at 3:09

I don't know if I fully understood your question. This is how I read it:

Your decorator is not yet complete. As it shows, it's still abstract and incomplete:

abstract class AnimalDecorator extends Animal {
    protected $animal;

    public function __construct(Animal $animal) {
        $this->animal = $animal;
    }
}

If you want to make it easily work, you should decorate all methods as well, so you don't need to do that when you extend from AnimalDecorator. Here exemplary for two of the many methods:

abstract class AnimalDecorator extends Animal {

    ...

    public function getSkinColor() {
        return $this->animal->getSkinColor();
    }

    public function setSleep($hours) {
        $this->animal->setSleep($hours);
    }


    ...

After you've delegated all methods, you can override the ones you want to in your concrete decorator as you already do:

class ReptileSkinDecorator extends AnimalDecorator {
    public function getSkinColor() {
        return "reptile";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was just going to write this same answer. Can we share the points? ;-) (don't understand why it doesn't have more upvotes) –  Rafa Mar 5 '13 at 15:46

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