Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to fiddle around and create a little fadeOut function in JavaScript, This is what I came up with:

function fadeOut(id, time){
  var elem = document.getElementById(id);
   elem.style.opacity = 1;
   var opc = 1;
   while(opc >= (1/time)){
      opc -= (1/time);
      console.log(opc);
      elem.style.opacity = opc;
   }
   elem.style.opacity = 0;
}

But this will not show the div's opacity in "real-time" but rather the end result, which is opacity = 0;
I've tested it out here:

fadeOut("hello",10000);
document.getElementById("hello").style.opacity = 1;
fadeOut("hello",10000);
document.getElementById("hello").style.opacity = 1;
fadeOut("hello",10000);
document.getElementById("hello").style.opacity = 1;

It would take it a long time to calculate and only when it finishes it will dump the result,
not showing it seamlessly, while calculating,
How can I resolve this?

share|improve this question
    
You have to do this with interval timers (setInterval() or setTimeout()). The browser won't update the layout while your code is running (usually). –  Pointy Jun 2 '12 at 16:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to set timers, as, until your function is done and the event handler can run, the UI won't be updated.

share|improve this answer

It is because you are not 'yielding` the thread so as to allow the browser to apply the changes.

Use setTimeout(..) instead like this:

function fadeOut(id, time){
   var elem = document.getElementById(id);
   if(opc >= (1/time)){
      opc -= (1/time);
      console.log(opc);
      elem.style.opacity = opc;
      setTimeout(function(){fadeOut(id,time);}, 100);
   }
   else
      elem.style.opacity = 0;
}

Not really a great code but it gives you the idea.

May be you could use jQuery library. In that case, you will use fadeOut

share|improve this answer

one potential causing this problem can be bubbling of event.try to use event.stopPropagation() to prevent the event (in case that you are using the FadeOut function in response to an event) from bubbling up.

the code is

function StopBubble(e)
{   
    if (!e)
        e = window.event;

    e.cancelBubble = true; /* Microsoft */
    if (e.stopPropagation)
        e.stopPropagation(); /* W3C */
}
share|improve this answer

Why not to use a JavaScript library like jQuery? Because some JavaScript code is not compatible with different sorts of browsers.

In jQuery you can use this:

$(".id").css("background","blue").fadeOut("slow");

It's just my opinion.

share|improve this answer

You have to specify a delay between every modification you make to the DOM in order to see the effect. There is no option in javascript to add a pause feature, so you have to rely on timers. There are two ways to achieve this. Most commonly used approach is setInterval(fn,sec). But setInterval is bad, because it executes the callback every interval of time specified regardless the previous execution is complete or not.

I personally suggest using a library rather than re-inventing the wheel. But its always good to have a basic understanding what the libraries do behind the scene.

Below is a sample snippet to achieve this without setInterval.

Note: This is just for demonstration. Not cross browser compatible. Extend it for reusability and cross broswer compatibility.

<div id="mydiv"></div>

function fadeOut() {

    var _timeOut,
        _proceed = true,
        _elm = document.getElementById( "mydiv" ),
        _opacity;

    function addOpacity() {

        // _elm.style.opacity will return empty string
        // see https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/window.getComputedStyle
        // getComputedStyle() not cross broswer

        _opacity = +window.getComputedStyle( _elm, null ).getPropertyValue( "opacity" );
        if( _opacity > 0.1 ) {
            // a simple algorithm for basic animation
            _elm.style.opacity = _opacity / 2;
        } else {
            _elm.style.opacity = 0;
            _proceed = false;
        }
    }

    (function animate() {
        if( !_proceed ) {
            clearTimeout( _timeOut );
            return;
        }

        addOpacity();

        // unlike setInterval(), this approach waits for addOpacity() to complete before its executed again
        _timeOut = setTimeout( animate, 1000 );

    }());   

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.