Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm working on a program for a C class and I reached a point where I don't know what to do. We are implementing a String library type.

I have my header file (MyString.h)

typedef struct {
    char *buffer;
    int length;
    int maxLength;
} String;

String *newString(const char *str);

The file implementing the functions (MyString.c)

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "MyString.h"

String *newString(const char *str) {

// Allocate memory for the String
String *newStr = (String*)malloc(sizeof(String));

if (newStr == NULL) {
    printf("ERROR: Out of memory\n");
    return NULL;
}   

// Count the number of characters
int count;
for (count = 0; *(str + count) != '\0'; count++);
count++;

// Allocate memory for the buffer
newStr->buffer = (char*)malloc(count * sizeof(char));

if (newStr->buffer == NULL) {
    printf("ERROR: Out of memory\n");
    return NULL;
}

// Copy into the buffer
while (*str != '\0')
    *(newStr->buffer++) = *(str++);
*(++newStr->buffer) = '\0';

// Set the length and maximum length
newStr->length = count;
newStr->maxLength = count;

printf("newStr->buffer: %p\n",newStr->buffer); // For testing purposes

return newStr;
}

And a tester (main.c)

#include <stdio.h>
#include "MyString.h"

main() {
char str[] = "Test character array";

String *testString = newString(str);

printf("testString->buffer: %p\n",testString->buffer); // Testing only
}

The problem is that, even though testString is pointing to the String created in newString(), their buffers point to different memory addresses. Why is that?

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

By using *(++newStr->buffer) and *(newStr->buffer++), you're moving newStr->buffer to essentially point to the end of the string.. You need to modify your code as such:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "MyString.h"

String *newString(const char *str) {
    // Allocate memory for the String
    String *newStr = (String*)malloc(sizeof(String));

    if (newStr == NULL) {
        printf("ERROR: Out of memory\n");
        return NULL;
    }

    // Count the number of characters
    int count;
    for (count = 0; *(str + count) != '\0'; count++);
    count++;

    // Allocate memory for the buffer
    newStr->buffer = (char*)malloc(count * sizeof(char));

    if (newStr->buffer == NULL) {
        printf("ERROR: Out of memory\n");
        return NULL;
    }

    char *pBuffer = newStr->buffer; // don't move newStr->buffer, have another pointer for that.

    // Copy into the buffer
    while (*str != '\0')
        *(pBuffer++) = *(str++);
    *pBuffer = '\0';

    // Set the length and maximum length
    newStr->length = count;
    newStr->maxLength = count;

    printf("newStr->buffer: %p\n", newStr->buffer); // For testing purposes

    return newStr;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That did it. Thanks a lot! –  fpele Jun 2 '12 at 18:04
    
As suggested by the other answers I would also consider using strcpy instead of manually copying the string, too :) –  Saul Jun 2 '12 at 18:18
1  
@fpele Also, *(++pBuffer) = '\0'; should be *pBuffer = '\0';. When the copying while ends, pBuffer already points one behind the last written character. With *(++pBuffer) = '\0';, you have one unspecified byte between the copied part and the 0-terminator you write, and, more importantly, you write past the end of the malloced memory. That is undefined behaviour. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 2 '12 at 19:11
    
Thanks Daniel, fixed in the solution. –  Saul Jun 6 '12 at 23:48

As the other colleagues already pointed out, you modified your allocation pointer, which is a no no. Here your example but translated to a more "professional" way.

I would change your structure to:

typedef struct {
   char *buffer;
   size_t length;        /* strings and allocation in C are of type size_t not int */
   size_t alloclength;
} String;

String *newString(const char *str);

And the function would be changed to.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "MyString.h"

String *newString(const char *str)
{
  // Allocate memory for the String
  String *newStr = malloc(sizeof (String));  /* No typecast of void * in C, it's bad taste. */

  if(!newStr) {
    fprintf(stderr, "ERROR: Out of memory\n");     /* Errors are meant to be printed on stderr, not stdio */
    return NULL;
  }   
  // Count the number of characters
  newStr->length = strlen(str);          /* Learn to use the stdlib, there are a lot of usefull functions */
  newStr->alloclength = newStr->length+1;
  // Allocate memory for the buffer
  newStr->buffer = malloc(newStr->alloclength);   /* sizeof (char) is by definition always 1 */
  if(!newStr->buffer) {
    fprintf(stderr, "ERROR: Out of memory\n");
    return NULL;
  }
  // Copy into the buffer
  strcpy(newStr->buffer, str);   /* Because we already scaned the input with strlen, we can use safely the "unsafe" strcpy function. The strcpy will add the trailing 0 */
  printf("newStr->buffer: %p\n",newStr->buffer); // For testing purposes
  return newStr;
} 
share|improve this answer

You are modifying the buffer pointer inside the newly created String struct.

You should do:

char *newBuffer = newStr->buffer;
// Copy into the buffer
while (*str != '\0')
    *(newBuffer++) = *(str++);
*(++newBuffer) = '\0';
share|improve this answer

The explanation is pretty simple: You are modifying the buffer pointer in the newString() function:

// Copy into the buffer
while (*str != '\0')
    *(newStr->buffer++) = *(str++);
*(++newStr->buffer) = '\0';

You could use a temporary pointer here (like suggested in the other answers), but I'd like to recommend using the standard functions provided within string.h:

// Count the number of characters
int count;
count = strlen(str) + 1;

// Copy into the buffer
memcpy(newString->buffer, str, count)
share|improve this answer

The question is answered, but I think that there is a piece of code that you should add to avoid a subtle source of memory leak:

// Allocate memory for the buffer
newStr->buffer = (char*)malloc(count * sizeof(char));

if (newStr->buffer == NULL) {
    printf("ERROR: Out of memory\n");
    free(newStr); // free the memory allocated for newStr
    return NULL;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.