Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
int getmin(int a,int b)    
{   
   return a<b?a:b;    
}


void *reallocation(void *ptr,size_t size) //size_t in bytes
{

void *newptr;


int msize;
msize=getsize(ptr);

msize=getmin(msize,size);

    printf("msize=%d",msize);

newptr=malloc(size);
newptr=memcpy(newptr,ptr,msize);
free(ptr);  


 return newptr;

}

I have implemented my own realloc, and in order to get the size of the allocated memory using malloc(however i know there isn't any method for this in c).

My reallocation function is working fine on my system How do we get the size of the memory allocated by malloc().

Also can we do inplace reallocation if the size of the previously allocated memory is greater than the new required?

share|improve this question
    
What is your overall goal? Are you just rewriting realloc or are you trying to create an entire set of memory allocation routines? –  Steven Burnap Jun 2 '12 at 18:04
add comment

3 Answers 3

There is no portable way to get the size of memory allocated by malloc().

However, one can always do something like that to simulate what you want.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
void myfree(void * p) {
    size_t * in = p;
    if (in) { --in; free(in); }
}
void * mymalloc(size_t n) {
    size_t * result = malloc(n + sizeof(size_t));
    if (result) { *result = n; ++result; memset(result,0,n); }
    return result;
}
size_t getsize(void * p) {
    size_t * in = p;
    if (in) { --in; return *in; }
    return -1;
}
#define malloc(_x) mymalloc((_x))
#define free(_x) myfree((_x))
void *reallocation(void *ptr,size_t size) {
    void *newptr;
    int msize;
    msize=getsize(ptr);
    printf("msize=%d\n",msize);
    if (size <= msize) return ptr;
    newptr=malloc(size);
    memcpy(newptr,ptr,msize);
    free(ptr);
    return newptr;
}
int main() {
    char * aa = malloc(50);
    char * bb ;
    printf("aa size is %d\n",getsize(aa));
    strcpy(aa,"my cookie");
    bb = reallocation(aa,100);
    printf("bb size is %d\n",getsize(bb));
    printf("<%s>\n",bb);
    free(bb);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

malloc does not initialize memory to zero. (calloc is the equivalent that does.) If you are seeing things set to zero, it's accidental.

I believe the library version of realloc uses length information in the heap that is not directly available. (And it may overestimate the original allocation, which means it might copy a little extra memory when using realloc to expand the allocation. This generally has no effect.)

realloc likely doesn't do a copy when shrinking an allocation.

Also, I should note that in same cases, you don't have to do a copy even when realloc increases the size, for example, if the next block in the heap is free.

share|improve this answer
    
It might not be accidentally set to zero, most OS's fill a newly allocated page with zeroes for security reasons. –  JustSid Jun 2 '12 at 18:11
1  
@JustSid Yes, but you don't know that this is a newly allocated page. It may be previously allocated and freed memory. –  Steven Burnap Jun 2 '12 at 18:28
    
Try this fun code in g++: int *ip=new int;*ip=42;delete ip;int *ip2 = new int; std::out << *ip2 << endl;. It'll happily print "42". –  Steven Burnap Jun 2 '12 at 21:13
    
I never said that it was deterministic wether or not you get a new page. I just thought it was worth mentioning that its not accidentally zero in some cases. –  JustSid Jun 2 '12 at 21:38
add comment

the memory allocated by malloc gets initialized to zero, so i am checking for that condition.

That's incorrect. From the draft:

Description

2 The malloc function allocates space for an object whose size is specified by size and whose value is indeterminate.

Your getsize needs to be fixed.

My reallocation function is working fine.

You are not even fixing the alignment -- it may fail for certain types. Read this SO question.

Also can we do inplace reallocation if the size of the previously allocated memory is greater than the new required?

What would in-place reallocation mean? Shouldn't this be a simple no-op?

share|improve this answer
    
How can we fix the alignment? –  Luv Jun 2 '12 at 18:00
    
@Luv: see edit to my answer with relevant SO question. –  dirkgently Jun 2 '12 at 18:08
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.