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I have a javascript array like

[["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]]

How would I go about making this just

["$6", "$12", "$25", ...]
share|improve this question
6  
This is better known by the term "flatten" which is a variant of a "flat map". This can also be done with jQuery: $.map(arr, function (i) { return i }), due to how it treats the return value (acts like a "flat map"). –  user166390 Jun 2 '12 at 19:00
    
more info is needed, do you want to only flatten 1 level? –  ajax333221 Jun 2 '12 at 20:14
1  
@user166390 since the new ecma, you can do arr.map(function (i) { return i }); –  EaterOfCode Jul 19 '13 at 8:55
1  
@EaterOfCorpses: But [].map does not have the flattening behaviour that $.map does –  Eric Nov 7 '13 at 17:28
    
@Eric I see now, Im happy [].map doesn't tho. –  EaterOfCode Nov 8 '13 at 8:51

24 Answers 24

up vote 180 down vote accepted

You can use concat to merge arrays:

var arrays = [["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]];
var merged = [];
merged = merged.concat.apply(merged, arrays);

Using the apply method of concat will just take the second parameter as an array, so the last line is identical to this:

merged.concat(["$6"], ["$12"], …, ["$75"], ["$5"]);
share|improve this answer
4  
How did I not see your answer before? I could swear that I looked at all of them. Deleting my answer since you already had this covered. +1 –  squint Jun 2 '12 at 21:10
4  
Note that concat does not modify the source array, so the merged array will remain empty after the call to concat. Better to say something like: merged = merged.concat.apply(merged, arrays); –  Nate Jan 24 '13 at 21:12
22  
var merged = [].concat.apply([], arrays); seems to work fine to get it on one line. edit: as Nikita's answer already shows. –  Sean Mar 15 '13 at 16:37
10  
Or Array.prototype.concat.apply([], arrays). –  danhbear Jan 16 '14 at 1:03
3  
Note: this answer only flattens one level deep. For a recursive flatten, see the answer by @Trindaz. –  Phrogz Feb 21 '14 at 14:01

Here's a simple and performant functional solution:

> [].concat.apply([], [[1],[2,3],[4]])
[ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]

No imperative mess.

share|improve this answer
3  
In CoffeeScript this is [].concat([[1],[2,3],[4]]...) –  amoebe Jun 21 '13 at 18:49
4  
@amoebe your answer gives [[1],[2,3],[4]] as a result. The solution that @Nikita gives is correct for CoffeeScript as well as JS. –  Ryan Muller Jul 31 '13 at 17:22
1  
@RyanMuller No, my answer gives [1,2,3,4] as a result. For me it's the way to go in CoffeeScript because it's shorter and creates only one empty Array as opposed to @Nikita's solution.It yields a SyntaxError in plain old JS, maybe I can help you with your tests in CoffeeScript? –  amoebe Aug 6 '13 at 14:08
3  
Ahh, I found your error. You have an extra pair of square brackets in your notation, should be [].concat([1],[2,3],[4],...). –  Ryan Muller Aug 6 '13 at 15:27
4  
I think I found your error, too. The ... are actual code, not some ellipsis dots. –  amoebe Feb 23 '14 at 20:01

It can be best done by javascript reduce function.

var arrays = [["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]];

arrays = arrays.reduce(function(a, b){
     return a.concat(b);
});

js-fiddle

Mozilla docs

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain what is going on here? –  chovy Dec 13 '14 at 9:28

A solution for the more general case, when you may have some non-array elements in your array.

function flattenArrayOfArrays(a, r){
    if(!r){ r = []}
    for(var i=0; i<a.length; i++){
        if(a[i].constructor == Array){
            flattenArrayOfArrays(a[i], r);
        }else{
            r.push(a[i]);
        }
    }
    return r;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This approach was very effective in flattening the nested array form of result-sets you get from a JsonPath query. –  kevinjansz Jun 14 '13 at 6:26
1  
Added as a method of arrays: Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype,'flatten',{value:function(r){for(var a=this,i=0,r=r||[];i<a.length;++i)if(a[i]!=null)a[i] instanceof Array?a[i].flatten(r):r.push(a[i]);return r}}); –  Phrogz Feb 21 '14 at 13:59

Here's a short function that uses some of the newer JavaScript array methods to flatten an n-dimensional array.

// The previously posted solution actually didn't produce the correct result on nested
// arrays.  This simpler solution does.
function flatten(arr) {
  return arr.reduce(function (flat, toFlatten) {
    return flat.concat(Array.isArray(toFlatten) ? flatten(toFlatten) : toFlatten);
  }, []);
}

Usage:

flatten([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5]]); // [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
flatten([[[1, [1.1]], 2, 3], [4, 5]]); // [1, 1.1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
share|improve this answer

You can use Underscore:

var x = [[1], [2], [3, 4]];

_.flatten(x); // => [1, 2, 3, 4]
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4  
Whoah, did someone add Perl to JS? :-) –  JBRWilkinson May 31 '13 at 14:39
4  
@JBRWilkinson Maybe JS wants to Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!? –  styfle Jun 28 '13 at 21:20
    
1+ - You can also specify that you want a shallow flattened array by specifying true for the second argument. –  Josh Crozier Jan 18 at 23:32

What about using reduce(callback[, initialValue]) method of JavaScript 1.8

list.reduce( function( p,n){
    return p.concat( n  );
},[]);
share|improve this answer

To solve this problem, you don't need to import a library, a simple loop is both the simplest and most efficient solution :

for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
  a[i] = a[i][0];
}
share|improve this answer
3  
I would say, "Don't look for things more cryptic." ^^ –  user166390 Jun 2 '12 at 19:03
2  
I mean... when I see people advising to use a library for that... that's crazy... –  dystroy Jun 2 '12 at 19:05
3  
Ahh, to use a library just for this would be silly... but if it's already available. –  user166390 Jun 2 '12 at 19:05
1  
(I'm not exactly sure how a map, flatMap, or flatten function would make it less readable or practically slower though. But +1 for this solution that makes me think of C.) –  user166390 Jun 2 '12 at 19:08
5  
@dystroy The conditional part of the for loop isn't that readable. Or is it just me :D –  Andreas Jun 2 '12 at 19:13

That's not hard, just iterate over the arrays and merge them:

var result = [], input = [["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"]];

for (var i = 0; i < input.length; ++i) {
    result = result.concat(input[i]);
}
share|improve this answer

It looks like this looks like a job for RECURSION!

  • Handles multiple levels of nesting
  • Handles empty arrays and non array parameters
  • Has no mutation
  • Doesn't rely on modern browser features

Code:

var flatten = function(toFlatten) {
  var isArray = Object.prototype.toString.call(toFlatten) === '[object Array]';

  if (isArray && toFlatten.length > 0) {
    var head = toFlatten[0];
    var tail = toFlatten.slice(1);

    return flatten(head).concat(flatten(tail));
  } else {
    return [].concat(toFlatten);
  }
};

Usage:

flatten([1,[2,3],4,[[5,6],7]]);
// Result: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] 
share|improve this answer

I'm aware that this is hacky, but the must succinct way I know of to flatten an array(of any depth!) of strings(without commas!) is to turn the array into a string and then split the string on commas:

var myArray =[["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]];
var myFlatArray = myArray.toString().split(',');

myFlatArray;
// ["$6", "$12", "$25", "$25", "$18", "$22", "$10", "$0", "$15", "$3", "$75", "$5", "$100", "$7", "$3", "$75", "$5"]

This should work on any depth of nested arrays containing only strings and numbers(integers and floating points) with the caveat that numbers will be converted to strings in the process. This can be solved with a little mapping:

var myArray =[[[1,2],[3,4]],[[5,6],[7,8]],[[9,0]]];
var myFlatArray = myArray.toString().split(',').map(function(e) { return parseInt(e); });
myFlatArray;
// [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0]
share|improve this answer

If you only have arrays with 1 string element:

[["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"]].join(',').split(',');

will do the job. Bt that specifically matches your code example.

share|improve this answer
    
Whoever down voted, please explain why. I was searching for a decent solution and of all the solutions I liked this one the most. –  Anonymous Apr 18 '14 at 22:34
[1,[2,3],[4,[5,6]]].reduce(function(p, c) {
    return p.concat(c instanceof Array ? 
                    c.reduce(arguments.callee, []) : 
                    [c]); 
}, []);
share|improve this answer

if your array only consists out of integers or strings you can use this dirty hack:

var arr = [345,2,[34],2,[524,[5456]],[5456]];
var flat = arr.toString().split(',');

Works, in FF, IE and Chrome didn't test the other browsers yet.

share|improve this answer
    
Just wondering why this is a hack? I think it is a smart and simple way to do it. –  Tim Hong Mar 13 '14 at 19:41
    
IMO it's a hack because it abuses the .toString() function (.toString will call for me .toString recursively) which if I recall correctly returned previously "[object Array]" instead of a recursive arr.join(',') :) –  EaterOfCode Mar 14 '14 at 10:17
    
Thanks for the explanation. I have just experienced that yesterday. =) –  Tim Hong Mar 15 '14 at 4:35
    
@TimHong haha I hope nothing broke –  EaterOfCode Mar 17 '14 at 10:06
    
Hahaha. It was all good. I tested it before checking in anything. In the end, I wrote my own version of it. =) I pasted my answer here. (Should be on top now, since it is the newest answer.) Yeah, thanks for asking. Hahaha. –  Tim Hong Mar 17 '14 at 23:00

Here is my version of it. It allows you to flatten a complicated object which could be used in more scenarios:

Input

var input = {
   a: 'asdf',
   b: [1,2,3],
   c: [[1,2],[3,4]],
   d: {subA: [1,2]}
}

Code

The function is like this:

function flatten (input, output) {

  if (isArray(input)) {
    for(var index = 0, length = input.length; index < length; index++){
      flatten(input[index], output);
    }
  }
  else if (isObject(input)) {
    for(var item in input){
      if(input.hasOwnProperty(item)){
        flatten(input[item], output);
      }
    }
  }
  else {
    return output.push(input);
  }
};

function isArray(obj) {
  return Array.isArray(obj) || obj.toString() === '[object Array]';
}

function isObject(obj) {
  return obj === Object(obj);
}

Usage

var output = []

flatten(input, output);

Output

["asdf", 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2]

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Let's talk about performance. In case you're looking for a performant solution, you'd better do it in some stupid, ad-hoc way.

http://jsperf.com/square-brackets-vs-array-prototype

var count = arrays.length;
var merged = new Array(count);
var c = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < count; ++i)
    for (var j = 0, jlen = arrays[i].length; j < jlen; ++j)
        merged[c++] = arrays[i][j];

This code is about six times faster than a solution with concat.

share|improve this answer

To flatten an array of arrays in one line:

var myArray = [[1, 2], [3, 4, 5], [6, 7]]
myArray.reduce(Function.prototype.apply.bind(Array.prototype.concat))
// flattened: [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ]
share|improve this answer

Say your array of arrays is stored in obj. We will store the final output in obj1.

The trivial approach in javascript is:

for(var i=0;i<obj.length;i++) 
  for(var j =0;j<obj[i].length;j++) 
    obj1.push(obj[i][j]);

Here is the code output on the node console.

> var obj=[];
undefined

> obj=[["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]]
[ [ '$6' ],
  [ '$12' ],
  [ '$25' ],
  [ '$25' ],
  [ '$18' ],
  [ '$22' ],
  [ '$10' ],
  [ '$0' ],
  [ '$15' ],
  [ '$3' ],
  [ '$75' ],
  [ '$5' ],
  [ '$100' ],
  [ '$7' ],
  [ '$3' ],
  [ '$75' ],
  [ '$5' ] ]

> var obj1=[];
undefined

> for(var i=0;i<obj.length;i++) for(var j =0;j<obj[i].length;j++) obj1.push(obj[i][j]);
17

> obj1
[ '$6',
  '$12',
  '$25',
  '$25',
  '$18',
  '$22',
  '$10',
  '$0',
  '$15',
  '$3',
  '$75',
  '$5',
  '$100',
  '$7',
  '$3',
  '$75',
  '$5' ]
> 
share|improve this answer
7  
That's really a misleading variable name :D –  Andreas Jun 2 '12 at 19:06

Here's another deep flatten for modern browsers:

function flatten(xs) {
  xs = Array.prototype.concat.apply([], xs);
  return xs.some(Array.isArray) ? flatten(xs) : xs;
};
share|improve this answer

What about deep flatten & Object Oriented ?

    [23, [34, 454], 12, 34].flatten();
    // -->   [23,34, 454, 12, 34]

[23, [34, 454,[66,55]], 12, 34].flatten();

// -->  [23, 34, 454, [66,55], 12, 34]

DEEP Flatten :

[23, [34, 454,[66,55]], 12, 34].flatten(true);

// --> [23, 34, 454, 66, 55, 12, 34]

DEMO

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I prefer to do it with recursion, so the nesting can be to any depth.
something like that:

function flatten(array, i) {
  i = ~~i;

  if(i >= array.length)
    return array;

  if(Array.isArray(array[i])) {
    return flatten(array.slice(0,i)
      .concat(array[i], array.slice(i+1)), i);
  }

  return flatten(array, i+1);
}

Example:

var weirdArray = [[],1,2,3,[4,5,6,[7,8,9,[10,11,[12,[[[[[13],[[[[14]]]]]]]]]]]]]
flatten(weirdArray);
//returns ==> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14]
share|improve this answer

Using code from there: http://www.codeproject.com/Tips/805364/LINQ-for-JavaScript

I would write: myArray.enumerable().selectMany(function(x) { return x; }).array()

share|improve this answer

There's a much faster way of doing this than using the merge.concat.apply() method listed in the top answer, and by faster I mean more than several orders of magnitude faster. This assumes your environment has access to the ES5 Array methods.

var array2d = [
  ["foo", "bar"],
  ["baz", "biz"]
];
merged = array2d.reduce(function(prev, next) {
    return prev.concat(next);
});

Here's the jsperf link: http://jsperf.com/2-dimensional-array-merge

share|improve this answer

Since this hasn't been mentioned yet:

If you're using underscore.js, the _.flatten() function will recursively flatten all nested levels of the array, _.flatten(arrays):

var arrays = [[1], [2, [3, 4, 5]]],
    merged = _.flatten(arrays);

console.log(merged); // [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

Example Here


If you want a shallow array, specify true for the second argument, _.flatten(arrays, true):

var arrays = [[1], [2, [3, 4, 5]]],
    merged = _.flatten(arrays, true);

console.log(merged); // [1, 2, [3, 4, 5]]

Example Here

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