Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am learning multithreading performance in C. When I tried to write a sample code, I bumped into a problem:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct{
    int a;
    char b;
    } args;

void* some_func (void* arg)
{
    args *argsa = malloc(sizeof(args));
//copy the content of arg to argsa, 
//so changes to arg in main would not affect argsa
    *argsa = *(args*) arg; 
    int i = 10;
    for (; i > 0; i--)
    {
        usleep (1); //to give other threads chances to cut in
        printf ("This is from the thread %d\n", argsa->a);
    }
    free (argsa);
}
int main()

{
    pthread_t thread[3];
    args ss;
    int index = 0;
    ss.b = 's';
    for (; index <3 ; index++)
    {
        ss.a = index;
        if (pthread_create (thread+index, NULL, some_func, (void*)&ss ))
        {
            usleep(10);
            printf ("something is wrong creating the thread"); 
        }
    }
        pthread_join ( thread[0], NULL);
        pthread_join ( thread[1], NULL);
        pthread_join ( thread[2], NULL);
    return 0;
}

I know char b in the struct is useless, but I just want to practice passing a structure. I expect the code to print out "This is from the thread x", where x is 0, 1 or 2, alternatively. However, the code currently only gives me "This is from the thread 2" 30 times. I believe there is something wrong with

*argsa = *(args*) arg; 

But I can't find a way to solve this and get the desired output.

Any help would be appreciated!

share|improve this question
1  
This is unrelated to the problem but to improve your code: Why are you passing the struct as void * rather than args *? and Why are you allocating argsa on the heap rather than just on the stack? – Matt Jun 2 '12 at 21:34
    
@Matt Yes, I could have passed it as args*--I just didn't see the difference. I allocated argsa on heap to avoid that the 'ss' might be changed. i.e.if args *argsa = malloc(sizeof(args)); *argsa = *(args*) arg; becomes args *argsa = (args*)arg, when arg->a in main changes from 0 to 1, would argsa->a in the first thread become 1? – AoZ Jun 2 '12 at 22:09
    
To allocate argsa on the stack you would get this: args argsa = *(args*)arg; which would still copy all of the struct in the same way. Note you would have to access members of argsa with args.a rather than argsa->a. The reason to use args* instead of void* is for clarity that you are passing args*, for better type safety, and to avoid having to cast the pointer to void* and back. – Matt Jun 2 '12 at 22:18
2  
@Matt pthread_create requires that the function take a void* argument. – Dave Jun 2 '12 at 23:58
    
@Dave Oh right, I forgot about that. – Matt Jun 3 '12 at 0:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because you are passing the same pointer to all the threads. By the time thread 0 has started, you have already incremented the value of ss.a to 1 (and then 2).

This is a bit more correct:

void* some_func (void* arg)
{
    args *argsa = (args*)arg;
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        usleep (1); //to give other threads chances to cut in
        printf ("This is from the thread %d\n", argsa->a);
    }
}
int main()
{
    pthread_t thread[3];
    args ss[3];
    int index;
    for (index = 0; index < 3; index++)
    {
        ss[index].a = index;

        if (pthread_create(&thread[index], NULL, some_func, &ss[index] ))
        {
            printf ("something is wrong creating the thread"); 
        }
    }
    pthread_join ( thread[0], NULL);
    pthread_join ( thread[1], NULL);
    pthread_join ( thread[2], NULL);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a bad solution. malloc is already being used presumably with the intent of making a copy of the argument, why continue to copy the reference that is also being used by different threads? – pb2q Jun 2 '12 at 21:11
    
You make a good point. But solving the data copy wasn't the issue I was trying to solve for him. A truly correct solution would involve having main "wait" for each thread to copy the data prior to continuing. (A sleep statement to wait for the data to be copied is BAD). You would need a proper signaling technique - beyond the scope of the question). But since pthread_join is called inside main, you are guaranteed that the lifetime of ss[index] won't fall of the stack before thread exits. So the solution above is safe, so long as as args doesn't fall off the stack. – selbie Jun 2 '12 at 21:15
    
pardon me, I missed your array in main, that's better – pb2q Jun 2 '12 at 21:18
    
Thanks, selbie. That works. But as you mentioned, it does not actually solve the data copy issue since several structs have to be created. What is the right way to do that? Pardon me, but I have no clue. – AoZ Jun 2 '12 at 22:05
    
+1 for the correct diagnosis of the problem. The solution with a separate structure for each thread is correct and works without thread synchronization functions. If a single structure must be used, then the solution will ensure that the created threads and the main thread have mutually exclusive access to the data structure. – Jonathan Leffler Jun 3 '12 at 2:23

The pattern to use to solve this kind of problem is as follows:

  1. Create a structure that will hold the parameters you want to pass to the thread.

  2. Allocate such a structure with malloc.

  3. Fill in the structure.

  4. Pass the pointer to the structure to the thread.

  5. When the thread is finished with the structure, the thread frees it.

This assumes you don't need to get any information back from the thread. If you do, you can change it so that the code that joins the thread frees the structure. That allows the structure to hold a reply as well -- you join the thread, read the response information, and then free the structure.

No special locking or synchronization is required because while the newly-created thread exists, it is the only thread that touches the structure.

share|improve this answer

Sorry guys, but I was trying to solve the same issue and I don't think a proper answer was given yet, in order to solve the problem. I tried this on my own and I came up with the following code. Now, I compiled and run it and it pretty worked as I expected, still I not that confident that the "lock in main and unlock in child process" is the most elegant solution, so I'd like to know what you think about it. Thank you very much in advance for any clarification.

Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct{
    int a;
    char b;
    } args;

pthread_mutex_t lock;

void* some_func (void *arg) {
    args argsa = *(args*)arg;
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&lock);
    printf ("This is from the thread %d\n", argsa.a);
}

int main() {
    pthread_t thread[10];
    args ss;
    int i, index=0;
    ss.b = 's';

    if (pthread_mutex_init(&lock, NULL) != 0) {
        printf("\n mutex init failed\n");
        return 1;
    }

    for (index = 0; index < 10 ; index++)
    {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&lock);
        ss.a = index;
        printf("index=%d, ", ss.a);
        if (pthread_create (thread+index, NULL, some_func, (void*)&ss ))
        {
            usleep(10);
            printf ("something is wrong creating the thread"); 
        }
    }
    for(i=0;i<10;i++)
        pthread_join ( thread[0], NULL);
    return 0;
}

Output:

#./program
index=0, This is from the thread 0
index=1, This is from the thread 1
index=2, This is from the thread 2
index=3, This is from the thread 3
index=4, This is from the thread 4
index=5, This is from the thread 5
index=6, This is from the thread 6
index=7, This is from the thread 7
index=8, This is from the thread 8
index=9, This is from the thread 9
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.