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C++ noob here with an AS3 background. Currently making my way through the book C++ Primer Plus.

My understanding is that string is a member of the std namespace, so why does the following occur?

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    using namespace std;

    string myString = "Press ENTER to quit program!";
    cout << "Come up and C++ me some time." << endl;
    printf("Follow this command: %s", myString);
    cin.get();

    return 0;
}

enter image description here

Each time the program runs, myString prints a seemingly random string of 3 characters, such as in the output above.

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2  
Just to let you know, a lot of people criticize that book. Which I can understand, because there isn't much about object-oriented programming, but I don't think it is as bad as people claim. –  Jesse Good Jun 2 '12 at 21:27
    
ouf! well, it's good to keep this in mind while i make my way thru the book. I'm sure it won't be the only C++ book i'll read over the course of the next year or so, so i hope it doesn't do too much damange :) –  TheDarkIn1978 Jun 2 '12 at 21:30
3  
Why are you using printf() in C++ its not type safe. –  Loki Astari Jun 2 '12 at 22:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 62 down vote accepted

It's compiling because printf isn't type safe, since it uses variable arguments in the C sense. printf has no option for std::string, only a C-style string. Using something else in place of what it expects definitely won't give you the results you want. It's actually undefined behaviour, so anything at all could happen.

The easiest way to fix this, since you're using C++, is printing it normally with std::cout, since std::string supports that through operator overloading:

std::cout << "Follow this command: " << myString;

If, for some reason, you need to extract the C-style string, you can use the c_str() method of std::string to get a const char * that is null-terminated. Using your example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    using namespace std;

    string myString = "Press ENTER to quit program!";
    cout << "Come up and C++ me some time." << endl;
    printf("Follow this command: %s", myString.c_str()); //note the use of c_str
    cin.get();

    return 0;
}

If you want a function that is like printf, but type safe, look into variadic templates (C++11, supported on all major compilers as of MSVC12). You can find an example of one here. There's nothing I know of implemented like that in the standard library, but there might be in Boost, specifically boost::format.

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1  
no mention of using cout for the string as well? –  Mooing Duck Jan 9 '13 at 1:08
    
@MooingDuck, Good point. It's in Jerry's answer, but being the accepted answer, this is what people see, and they might leave before seeing the others. I've added that option in so as to be the first solution seen, and the recommended one. –  chris Jan 9 '13 at 1:11
    
@MattMcNabb, Thanks, that took years to notice. –  chris Nov 23 at 22:00

Please don't use printf("%s", your_string.c_str());

Use cout << your_string; instead. Short, simple and typesafe. In fact, when you're writing C++, you generally want to avoid printf entirely -- it's a leftover from C that's rarely needed or useful in C++.

As to why you should use cout instead of printf, the reasons are numerous. Here's a sampling of a few of the most obvious:

  1. As the question shows, printf isn't type-safe. If the type you pass differs from that given in the conversion specifier, printf will try to use whatever it finds on the stack as if it were the specified type, giving undefined behavior. Some compilers can warn about this under some circumstances, but some compilers can't/won't at all, and none can under all circumstances.
  2. printf isn't extensible. You can only pass primitive types to it. The set of conversion specifiers it understands is hard-coded in its implementation, and there's no way for you to add more/others. Most well-written C++ should use these types primarily to implement types oriented toward the problem being solved.
  3. It makes decent formatting much more difficult. For an obvious example, when you're printing numbers for people to read, you typically want to insert thousands separators every few digits. The exact number of digits and the characters used as separators varies, but cout has that covered as well. For example:

    std::locale loc("");
    std::cout.imbue(loc);
    
    std::cout << 123456.78;
    

    The nameless locale (the "") picks a locale based on the user's configuration. Therefore, on my machine (configured for US English) this prints out as 123,456.78. For somebody who has their computer configured for (say) Germany, it would print out something like 123.456,78. For somebody with it configured for India, it would print out as 1,23,456.78 (and of course there are many others). With printf I get exactly one result: 123456.78. It is consistent, but it's consistently wrong for everybody everywhere. Essentially the only way to work around it is to do the formatting separately, then pass the result as a string to printf, because printf itself simply will not do the job correctly.

  4. Although they're quite compact, printf format strings can be quite unreadable. Even among C programmers who use printf virtually every day, I'd guess at least 99% would need to look things up to be sure what the # in %#x means, and how that differs from what the # in %#f means (and yes, they mean entirely different things).
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7  
@TheDarkIn1978: You probably forgot to #include <string>. VC++ has some oddities in its headers that will let you define a string, but not send it to cout, without including the <string> header. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 2 '12 at 21:39
4  
@Jerry: Just want to point out that using printf is MUCH faster than using cout when dealing with large data. Thus, please dont say that it is useless :D –  Programmer Feb 5 '13 at 16:00
3  
@Programmer: see stackoverflow.com/questions/12044357/…. Summary: most times that cout is slower, it's because you've used std::endl where you shouldn't. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 5 '13 at 16:55
4  
Typical C++ expert arrogance. If printf does exist, why not use it? –  kuroi neko Aug 31 at 14:32
1  
OK, sorry for the snappy comment. Still, printf is pretty handy for debugging and the streams, though vastly more powerful, have the drawback that the code does not give any idea of the actual output. For formatted output, printf is still a viable alternative, and it's a shame both systems can't cooperate better. Just my opinion, of course. –  kuroi neko Aug 31 at 15:45

use myString.c_str() if you want a c-like string (const char*) to use with printf

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