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C++ noob here with an AS3 background. Currently making my way thru this book.

My understanding is that string is a member of the std namespace, so why does the following occur?

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    using namespace std;

    string myString = "Press ENTER to quit program!";
    cout << "Come up and C++ me some time." << endl;
    printf("Follow this command: %s", myString);
    cin.get();

    return 0;
}

enter image description here

Each time the program runs, myString prints a seemingly random string of 3 characters, such as in the output above.

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2  
Just to let you know, a lot of people criticize that book. Which I can understand, because there isn't much about object-oriented programming, but I don't think it is as bad as people claim. –  Jesse Good Jun 2 '12 at 21:27
    
ouf! well, it's good to keep this in mind while i make my way thru the book. I'm sure it won't be the only C++ book i'll read over the course of the next year or so, so i hope it doesn't do too much damange :) –  TheDarkIn1978 Jun 2 '12 at 21:30
3  
Why are you using printf() in C++ its not type safe. –  Loki Astari Jun 2 '12 at 22:16
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3 Answers

up vote 49 down vote accepted

It's compiling because printf isn't type safe, since it uses variable arguments in the C sense. printf has no option for std::string, only a C-style string. Using something else in place of what it expects definitely won't give you the results you want. It's actually undefined behaviour, so anything at all could happen.

The easiest way to fix this, since you're using C++, is printing it normally with std::cout, since std::string supports that through operator overloading:

std::cout << "Follow this command: " << myString;

If, for some reason, you need to extract the C-style string, you can use the c_str() method of std::string to get a const char * that is null-terminated. Using your example:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    using namespace std;

    string myString = "Press ENTER to quit program!";
    cout << "Come up and C++ me some time." << endl;
    printf("Follow this command: %s", myString.c_str()); //note the use of c_str
    cin.get();

    return 0;
}

If you want a function that is like printf, but type safe, look into variadic templates (C++11, supported on all major compilers as of MSVC12). You can find an example of one here. There's nothing I know of implemented like that in the standard library, but there might be in Boost, specifically boost::format.

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no mention of using cout for the string as well? –  Mooing Duck Jan 9 '13 at 1:08
    
@MooingDuck, Good point. It's in Jerry's answer, but being the accepted answer, this is what people see, and they might leave before seeing the others. I've added that option in so as to be the first solution seen, and the recommended one. –  chris Jan 9 '13 at 1:11
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use myString.c_str() if you want a c-like string (const char*) to use with printf

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Please don't use printf("%s", your_string.c_str());

Use cout << your_string; instead. Short, simple and typesafe. In fact, when you're writing C++, you generally want to avoid printf entirely -- it's a leftover from C that's rarely needed or useful in C++.

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when i try to compile cout << myString << endl; i receive the following error: Error 1 error C2679: binary '<<' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'std::string' (or there is no acceptable conversion) –  TheDarkIn1978 Jun 2 '12 at 21:39
7  
@TheDarkIn1978: You probably forgot to #include <string>. VC++ has some oddities in its headers that will let you define a string, but not send it to cout, without including the <string> header. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 2 '12 at 21:39
    
that i did forget (actually didn't know about)! thanks :) –  TheDarkIn1978 Jun 2 '12 at 21:41
2  
@Jerry: Just want to point out that using printf is MUCH faster than using cout when dealing with large data. Thus, please dont say that it is useless :D –  Programmer Feb 5 '13 at 16:00
2  
@Programmer: see stackoverflow.com/questions/12044357/…. Summary: most times that cout is slower, it's because you've used std::endl where you shouldn't. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 5 '13 at 16:55
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