Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was looking for the fastest method to calculate the square root(integer) of a number(integer). I came across this solution in wikipedia which finds the square root of a number(if its a perfect square) or the square root of its nearest lower perfect square (if the given number is not a perfect square:

short isqrt(short num) {
    short res = 0;
    short bit = 1 << 14; // The second-to-top bit is set: 1L<<30 for long
    // "bit" starts at the highest power of four <= the argument.
    while (bit > num)
        bit >>= 2;
    while (bit != 0) {
        if (num >= res + bit) {
            num -= res + bit;
            res = (res >> 1) + bit;
        }
        else
            res >>= 1;
        bit >>= 2;
    }
    return res;
}

I tried a lot of test runs to trace the algorithm but I do not seem to understand the portion inside while(bit!=0). Can anybody explain this part to me?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I traced out a few small examples too, and I think I got it. As best as I understand it, the algorithm is building up the answer one binary digit at a time, from highest bit to lowest bit.

Let "num_init" be the value of num at the beginning of the function. Suppose at some iteration, we have that bit = 4^x and that num is equal to some value "num_curr" (a quick glance shows that until bit is 0, it is always a power of 4). Then res is of the form y*2^(x+1), where y^2 + num_curr = num_init, and y is less than the actual answer, but within 2^x.

This invariant on the values of num, res, and bit is going to be key. The way this is done in the code is that

while (bit != 0) {
    ....
}

is moving our imaginary pointer left to right, and at each step we determine whether this bit is 0 or 1.

Going to the first if statement, suppose our imaginary "built-up" integer is equal to y, and we're looking at the 2^x bit. Then, the bit is 1 iff the original value of num is at least (y + 2^x)^2 = y^2 + y*2^(x+1) + 4^x. In other words, the bit is one if the value of num at that point is at least y*2^(x+1) + 4^x (since we have the invariant that the value of num has dropped by y^2). Conveniently enough, res = y*2^(x+1) and bit = 4^x. We then get the point behind

if (num >= res + bit) {
    num -= res + bit;
    res = (res >> 1) + bit;
}
else 
    res >>= 1;   

which adds a 1 bit at our imaginary spot if necessary, then updates res and num to keep the invariant. Lastly

bit >>= 2;

updates bit and moves everything along one step.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.