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I've got some unsafe C# code that cannot be changed and that exposes methods like this:

static unsafe void Foo(
    byte* a, int aLength,
    byte* b, int bLength,
    byte* c, int cLength,
    byte* d, int dLength,
    byte* e, int eLength);

I'm calling these methods like this:

static void Bar(
    byte[] a, int aOffset, int aLength,
    byte[] b, int bOffset, int bLength,
    byte[] c, int cOffset, int cLength,
    byte[] d, int dOffset, int dLength,
    byte[] e, int eOffset, int eLength)
{
    fixed (byte* a_ = &a[aOffset])
    fixed (byte* b_ = &b[bOffset])
    fixed (byte* c_ = &c[cOffset])
    fixed (byte* d_ = &d[dOffset])
    fixed (byte* e_ = &e[eOffset])
    {
        Foo(a_, aLength,
            b_, bLength,
            c_, cLength,
            d_, dLength,
            e_, eLength);
    }
}

(Argument validation omitted for brevity.)

This works well unless one of the byte arrays has a length of zero. In this case I get an Index­Out­Of­Range­Exception.

Index was outside the bounds of the array.

How can I prevent the exception, preferably without writing lots of boilerplate code and without switching from fixed to something else?

The unsafe methods do not read from or write to arguments where the length is zero.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't access any elements in an array that is empty, so replace any of the arrays that are empty with a dummy array that contains an element that you can access:

if (aLength == 0) a = new int[1];
if (bLength == 0) b = new int[1];
if (cLength == 0) c = new int[1];
if (dLength == 0) d = new int[1];
if (eLength == 0) e = new int[1];
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Since it doesn't read from or write to to arrays with length zero, you could change

fixed (byte* a_ = &a[aOffset])
fixed (byte* b_ = &b[bOffset])
fixed (byte* c_ = &c[cOffset])
fixed (byte* d_ = &d[dOffset])
fixed (byte* e_ = &e[eOffset])

to

fixed (byte* a_ = (a.Length == 0 ? (byte*)IntPtr.Zero : &a[aOffset]))
fixed (byte* b_ = (b.Length == 0 ? (byte*)IntPtr.Zero : &b[aOffset]))
fixed (byte* c_ = (c.Length == 0 ? (byte*)IntPtr.Zero : &c[aOffset]))
fixed (byte* d_ = (d.Length == 0 ? (byte*)IntPtr.Zero : &d[aOffset]))
fixed (byte* e_ = (e.Length == 0 ? (byte*)IntPtr.Zero : &e[aOffset]))

however if you do this and then try to read or write to one of the empty arrays, you'll get a nullpointer exception.

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Compiler error "The right hand side of a fixed statement assignment may not be a cast expression" –  dtb Jun 2 '12 at 23:42
    
Yeah it looks like c# doesn't like the ? inside the fixed initializer –  HypnoToad Jun 3 '12 at 1:09
    
Then I would go with Guffa's dummy array suggestion. –  HypnoToad Jun 3 '12 at 1:13

Is

static void Bar( ... )
{
  byte[] dummy = new byte[1];
  fixed (byte* a_ = a.Lenght>0 ? &a[aOffset] : &dummy[0])
  ...
}

too clunky?

Edit:

Leaving the above in place only for historic reasons, ? operator won't work.

So you need to do without the fixed keyword and do something like

public unsafe struct UnsafePointerStruct
{
    public GCHandle gch;
    public byte* addr;
}

static unsafe UnsafePointerStruct GetUnsafePointer(Array a, int ai)
{
    UnsafePointerStruct ups=new UnsafePointerStruct();
    ups.gch=GCHandle.Alloc(a,GCHandleType.Pinned);
    if (a.Length<=ai) ups.addr=(byte*)IntPtr.Zero;
    ups.addr=(byte*)Marshal.UnsafeAddrOfPinnedArrayElement(a,ai);
    return ups;
}

static unsafe void Bar(
    byte[] a, int aOffset, int aLength,
    byte[] b, int bOffset, int bLength,
    byte[] c, int cOffset, int cLength,
    byte[] d, int dOffset, int dLength,
    byte[] e, int eOffset, int eLength)
{
    UnsafePointerStruct upsa=GetUnsafePointer(a,aOffset);
    UnsafePointerStruct upsb=GetUnsafePointer(b,bOffset);
    UnsafePointerStruct upsc=GetUnsafePointer(c,cOffset);
    UnsafePointerStruct upsd=GetUnsafePointer(d,dOffset);
    UnsafePointerStruct upse=GetUnsafePointer(e,eOffset);

    Foo(upsa.addr, aLength,
        upsb.addr, bLength,
        upsc.addr, cLength,
        upsd.addr, dLength,
        upse.addr, eLength);

    upsa.gch.Free();
    upsb.gch.Free();
    upsc.gch.Free();
    upsd.gch.Free();
    upse.gch.Free();
}
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Is there any problem with sharing the dummy across method calls, e.g. in multi-threading scenarios? –  dtb Jun 2 '12 at 23:45
    
I wouldn't think so, but it would be good defensive practice to move it outside the method and pin it with a GC handle on static constructor. –  Eugen Rieck Jun 2 '12 at 23:51
    
Hm.. I always thought that objects should be pinned for as short as possible. –  dtb Jun 2 '12 at 23:53
    
? : doesn't seem to work inside fixed statements. –  dtb Jun 2 '12 at 23:55
    
Long duration of pinning objects is very much mitigated, if the objects in question are static AND are allocated early (i.e.: They are close to the start of the object heap) –  Eugen Rieck Jun 2 '12 at 23:59

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