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I need to find the intersection of two sorted integer arrays and do it very fast.

Right now, I am using the following code:

int i = 0, j = 0;

while (i < arr1.Count && j < arr2.Count)
{
    if (arr1[i] < arr2[j])
    {
        i++;
    }
    else
    {
        if (arr2[j] < arr1[i])
        {
            j++;
        }
        else 
        {
            intersect.Add(arr2[j]);
            j++;
            i++;
        }
    }
}

Unfortunately it might to take hours to do all work.

How to do it faster? I found this article where SIMD instructions are used. Is it possible to use SIMD in .NET?

What do you think about:

http://docs.go-mono.com/index.aspx?link=N:Mono.Simd Mono.SIMD

http://netasm.codeplex.com/ NetASM(inject asm code to managed)

and something like http://www.atrevido.net/blog/PermaLink.aspx?guid=ac03f447-d487-45a6-8119-dc4fa1e932e1

 

EDIT:

When i say thousands i mean following (in code)

for(var i=0;i<arrCollection1.Count-1;i++)
{
    for(var j=i+1;j<arrCollection2.Count;j++)
    {
        Intersect(arrCollection1[i],arrCollection2[j])  
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Don't you want to break from the loop after you have found the intersection? –  Brendan Jun 2 '12 at 23:42
    
@Brendan But how can i detect this moment? –  Neir0 Jun 2 '12 at 23:45
3  
Your title says "two" but your question says "thousands". Can you describe what you're trying to do? There might be a better way instead of comparing two at a time. –  Mark Byers Jun 2 '12 at 23:46
    
Well what is considered intersection? The moment the value in the first array at location i is greater than the value in a second array? - if it is thousands, SIMD, might be the way to go –  Brendan Jun 2 '12 at 23:47
2  
Maybe HashSet is better data structure –  lukas Jun 2 '12 at 23:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

UPDATE

The fastest I got was 200ms with arrays size 10mil, with the unsafe version (Last piece of code).

The test I've did:

var arr1 = new int[10000000];
var arr2 = new int[10000000];

for (var i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
{
    arr1[i] = i;
    arr2[i] = i * 2;
}

var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

var result = arr1.IntersectSorted(arr2);

sw.Stop();

Console.WriteLine(sw.Elapsed); // 00:00:00.1926156

Full Post:

I've tested various ways to do it and found this to be very good:

public static List<int> IntersectSorted(this int[] source, int[] target)
{
    // Set initial capacity to a "full-intersection" size
    // This prevents multiple re-allocations
    var ints = new List<int>(Math.Min(source.Length, target.Length));

    var i = 0;
    var j = 0;

    while (i < source.Length && j < target.Length)
    {
        // Compare only once and let compiler optimize the switch-case
        switch (source[i].CompareTo(target[j]))
        {
            case -1:
                i++;

                // Saves us a JMP instruction
                continue;
            case 1:
                j++;

                // Saves us a JMP instruction
                continue;
            default:
                ints.Add(source[i++]);
                j++;

                // Saves us a JMP instruction
                continue;
        }
    }

    // Free unused memory (sets capacity to actual count)
    ints.TrimExcess();

    return ints;
}

For further improvement you can remove the ints.TrimExcess();, which will also make a nice difference, but you should think if you're going to need that memory.

Also, if you know that you might break loops that use the intersections, and you don't have to have the results as an array/list, you should change the implementation to an iterator:

public static IEnumerable<int> IntersectSorted(this int[] source, int[] target)
{
    var i = 0;
    var j = 0;

    while (i < source.Length && j < target.Length)
    {
        // Compare only once and let compiler optimize the switch-case
        switch (source[i].CompareTo(target[j]))
        {
            case -1:
                i++;

                // Saves us a JMP instruction
                continue;
            case 1:
                j++;

                // Saves us a JMP instruction
                continue;
            default:
                yield return source[i++];
                j++;

                // Saves us a JMP instruction
                continue;
        }
    }
}

Another improvement is to use unsafe code:

public static unsafe List<int> IntersectSorted(this int[] source, int[] target)
{
    var ints = new List<int>(Math.Min(source.Length, target.Length));

    fixed (int* ptSrc = source)
    {
        var maxSrcAdr = ptSrc + source.Length;

        fixed (int* ptTar = target)
        {
            var maxTarAdr = ptTar + source.Length;

            var currSrc = ptSrc;
            var currTar = ptTar;

            while (currSrc < maxSrcAdr && currTar < maxTarAdr)
            {
                switch ((*currSrc).CompareTo(*currTar))
                {
                    case -1:
                        currSrc++;
                        continue;
                    case 1:
                        currTar++;
                        continue;
                    default:
                        ints.Add(*currSrc);
                        currSrc++;
                        currTar++;
                        continue;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    ints.TrimExcess();
    return ints;
}

In summary, the most major performance hit was in the if-else's. Turning it into a switch-case made a huge difference (about 2 times faster).

share|improve this answer
    
var i = 0; is not the best case scenario to use var keyword IMO. Could you post/link to timing and tests? –  lukas Jun 3 '12 at 0:38
    
@lukas Added the test I've used in the beginning of the post. Can you tell me why var isn't suitable here? Are you talking about readability? –  Yorye Nathan Jun 3 '12 at 0:49
    
I question your measurements... At least your first example has its timing highly dependent on the number of ints that matched. –  Ilia G Jun 3 '12 at 0:52
    
@IliaG How come? Resizing the list from 10000000 to 100 doesn't differ from resizing it from 10000000 to 100000. I ran the test with arrays all zero's as well, and with non-intersecting arrays also - same timing (and even better timing if the arrays are non-intersecting AND in difference ranges) –  Yorye Nathan Jun 3 '12 at 0:53
    
I don't know. Your sample code produces exactly 23 matches. Changing your int generating code to use Random creates highly variable results. –  Ilia G Jun 3 '12 at 0:58

Have you tried something simple like this:

var a = Enumerable.Range(1, int.MaxValue/100).ToList();
var b = Enumerable.Range(50, int.MaxValue/100 - 50).ToList();

//var c = a.Intersect(b).ToList();
List<int> c = new List<int>();

var t1 = DateTime.Now;

foreach (var item in a)
{
    if (b.BinarySearch(item) >= 0)
        c.Add(item);
}

var t2 = DateTime.Now;

var tres = t2 - t1;

This piece of code takes 1 array of 21,474,836 elements and the other one with 21,474,786

If I use var c = a.Intersect(b).ToList(); I get an OutOfMemoryException

The result product would be 461,167,507,485,096 iterations using nested foreach

But with this simple code, the intersection occurred in TotalSeconds = 7.3960529 (using one core)

Now I am still not happy, so I am trying to increase the performance by breaking this in parallel, as soon as I finish I will post it

share|improve this answer
    
Binary search give O(m*lg(n)) when my approach O(m+n). So binary search good for very long arrays. In my case i have short arrays(15-30 elements) –  Neir0 Jun 3 '12 at 0:51
    
mmm But you said thousands...at first lol I just checked your edit... as you can see in my example I am talking about an intersection between 20 millions vs another array of 20 millions + without out of memory exceptions and in a razonable amount of time (7 sec) –  Jupaol Jun 3 '12 at 0:55
    
+1. In case anyone is interested, this is indeed a good approach for computing the intersection between sorted arrays where m << n, but can be significantly improved by re-using the insertion index returned by BinarySearch as an argument back to it to re-start the search from there, instead of searching the entire set again. –  sharky Aug 3 '13 at 2:57

Are arrCollection1 and arrCollection2 collections of arrays of integers? IN this case you should get some notable improvement by starting second loop from i+1 as opposed to 0

share|improve this answer
    
yes, sorry my bad –  Neir0 Jun 3 '12 at 0:16
    
I edited the code –  Neir0 Jun 3 '12 at 0:17

C# doesn't support SIMD. Additionally, and I haven't yet figured out why, DLL's that use SSE aren't any faster when called from C# than the non-SSE equivalent functions. Also, all SIMD extensions that I know of don't work with branching anyway, ie your "if" statements.

If you're using .net 4.0, you can use Parallel For to gain speed if you have multiple cores. Otherwise you can write a multithreaded version if you have .net 3.5 or less.

Here is a method similar to yours:

    IList<int> intersect(int[] arr1, int[] arr2)
    {
        IList<int> intersect = new List<int>();
        int i = 0, j = 0;
        int iMax = arr1.Length - 1, jMax = arr2.Length - 1;
        while (i < iMax && j < jMax)
        {
            while (i < iMax && arr1[i] < arr2[j]) i++;
            if (arr1[i] == arr2[j]) intersect.Add(arr1[i]);
            while (i < iMax && arr1[i] == arr2[j]) i++; //prevent reduntant entries
            while (j < jMax && arr2[j] < arr1[i]) j++;
            if (arr1[i] == arr2[j]) intersect.Add(arr1[i]);
            while (j < jMax && arr2[j] == arr1[i]) j++; //prevent redundant entries
        }
        return intersect;
    }

This one also prevents any entry from appearing twice. With 2 sorted arrays both of size 10 million, it completed in about a second. The compiler is supposed to remove array bounds checks if you use array.Length in a For statement, I don't know if that works in a while statement though.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually i already use TPL (not in intersect function but when loop over all arrays). Why "DLL's that use SSE aren't any faster when called from C# than the non-SSE equivalent functions" ? –  Neir0 Jun 3 '12 at 0:24
    
That's great for Intersect + Distinct, but if he only wants intersects then 1 second for 10mil elements is pretty slow. My implementation does that in 150ms (tested with 2 arrays, each 10mil elements, first being {0,1,2,3,...} and second being {0,2,4,6,8,...}). –  Yorye Nathan Jun 3 '12 at 0:26
    
I haven't figured out why the DLL was slower when called from C# but all other things being equal, the SSE calls were about 3x faster in c++ and about the same speed when called from C#. It may have something to do with pinvoke, but the datasets were very large. ymmv. –  HypnoToad Jun 3 '12 at 0:36
    
Yorye if you have a faster method you should post it. –  HypnoToad Jun 3 '12 at 0:36
    
@Doctor Zero Ok, i understand. I can pass not only 2 arrays to external function but all my arrays and do all work in external dll. So cost of one Pinvoke call will be low. –  Neir0 Jun 3 '12 at 0:41

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