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Is there a way to prevent StopIteration exceptions from being thrown from unrelated code (without having to catch them manually)?

Example: loop_all wants to loop through the myiter iterator and simply move on when this one has finished. This works unless some_dangerous_method or any other code in myiter raises a StopIteration.

def loop_all():
    myiter = myiter()
    try:
        while True:
            next(myiter) # <- I want exactly the StopIteration from this next method
    except StopIteration:
        pass

def myiter():
    some_dangerous_method() # what if this also raises a StopIteration?
    for i in some_other_iter():
        # here may be more code
        yield

Is there a way to make it clear to which StopIteration the code should react to?

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2  
Why do you think you will ever get a StopIteration from somewhere else? That's like expecting a random stdlib call such as getting the current time or a random number to fail... –  ThiefMaster Jun 2 '12 at 23:57
    
This is a real-life example but admittedly, I’d never thought of something like this to occur. –  Debilski Jun 3 '12 at 0:01
    
Also, there are several methods which call third-party code. I don’t want to do a catch all unless there is really, really no other way. –  Debilski Jun 3 '12 at 0:04
1  
Is this a real problem? Have you actually had other's StopIteration being caught by your code? Also, are you sure you need to catch it at all? Why not use a for loop to iterate? –  Ned Batchelder Jun 3 '12 at 0:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If a function you are calling is invoking next(iter), and isn't dealing with StopIteration, then that function has a bug. Fix it.

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As I’ve written above, the function is calling third-party code which may invode next(iter). It is supposed to crash the whole thing in that case and not have it behave in a strange way. –  Debilski Jun 3 '12 at 0:10
1  
If the third party code is raising StopIteration, then you are out of luck. There is no way to distinguish which iteration is ending. Get the third-party code fixed. –  Ned Batchelder Jun 3 '12 at 0:16

Perhaps I'm missing something but why not simply this:

def myiter():
    try:
        some_dangerous_method()
    except StopIteration:
        pass # or raise a different exception
    for i in some_other_iter():
        # here may be more code
        yield
share|improve this answer
    
This is more of a fix than a solution. –  Debilski Jun 3 '12 at 21:43
    
@Debilski A more complete solution is to create your own wrapper class that individually wraps every necessary method of the dangerous class with appropriate safeguards. –  Janne Karila Jun 4 '12 at 6:45

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