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Here is a simple class for iterating over a multidimensional numeric range:

#include <array>
#include <limits>

template <int N>
class NumericRange
{
public:
  //  typedef std::vector<double>::const_iterator const_iterator;
  NumericRange() {
    _lower.fill(std::numeric_limits<double>::quiet_NaN());
    _upper.fill(std::numeric_limits<double>::quiet_NaN());
    _delta.fill(std::numeric_limits<double>::quiet_NaN());
  }
  NumericRange(const std::array<double, N> & lower, const std::array<double, N> & upper, const std::array<double, N> & delta):
    _lower(lower), _upper(upper), _delta(delta) {
    _state.fill(std::numeric_limits<double>::quiet_NaN());
    _next_index_to_advance = 0;
  }

  const std::array<double, N> & get_state() const {
    return _state;
  }

  void start() {
    _state = _lower;
  }

  bool in_range(int index_to_advance = N-1) const {
    return ( _state[ index_to_advance ] - _upper[ index_to_advance ] ) < _delta[ index_to_advance ];
  }

  void advance(int index_to_advance = 0) {
    _state[ index_to_advance ] += _delta[ index_to_advance ];
    if ( ! in_range(index_to_advance) ) {
      if (index_to_advance < N-1) {
    // restart index_to_advance
    _state[index_to_advance] = _lower[index_to_advance];

    // carry
    index_to_advance;
    advance(index_to_advance+1);
      }
    }
  }

private:
  std::array<double, N> _lower, _upper, _delta, _state;
  int _next_index_to_advance;
};

int main() {
  std::array<double, 7> lower{0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0};
  std::array<double, 7> upper{1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0};
  std::array<double, 7> delta{0.03, 0.06, 0.03, 0.06, 0.03, 0.06, 0.03};

  NumericRange<7> nr(lower, upper, delta);
  int c = 0;
  for (nr.start(); nr.in_range(); nr.advance()) {
    const std::array<double, 7> & st = nr.get_state();
    ++c;
  }
  std::cout << "took " << c << " steps" << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

When I replace the advance function with a non-recursive variant, the runtime increases:

void advance(int index_to_advance = 0) {
  bool carry;
  do {
    carry = false;
    _state[ index_to_advance ] += _delta[ index_to_advance ];
    if ( ! in_range(index_to_advance) ) {
      if (index_to_advance < N-1) {
    // restart index_to_advance
    _state[index_to_advance] = _lower[index_to_advance];

    // carry
    ++index_to_advance;
    carry = true;
    //    advance(index_to_advance);
      }
    }
  } while (carry);
}

Runtimes were taken using unix user time via the command time. The code was compiled using gcc-4.7 with options -std=c++11 -O3 (but I think it should work with c++0x on gcc-4.6). The recursive version took 13s and the iterative version took 30s. Both require the same number of advance calls to terminate (and if you print the nr.get_state() array inside the for(ns.start()...) loop, both do the same thing).

This is a fun riddle! Help me figure out why recursive would be more efficient / more optimizable.

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2  
Try profiling. valgrind --callgrind is an good profiler. –  n.m. Jun 3 '12 at 0:59
    
Personally I like gdb. Break + backtrace –  David Stone Jun 3 '12 at 1:23
    
The performance I'm seeing is inconsistent. For the iterative version, I either get 30 or 100 seconds on different runs. Perhaps there is a subtle caching issue. –  Vaughn Cato Jun 3 '12 at 2:00
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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The recursive version is an example of tail-recursion which means that the compiler can transform the recursion into iteration. Now, once the transformation is performed, the recursive function would look similar to this:

void advance(int index_to_advance = 0) {
    _state[ index_to_advance ] += _delta[ index_to_advance ];
    while ( !in_range(index_to_advance) && index_to_advance < N-1 ) {
        // restart index_to_advance
        _state[index_to_advance] = _lower[index_to_advance];

        // carry
        ++index_to_advance;
        _state[ index_to_advance ] += _delta[ index_to_advance ];
    }
  }

As you see your version contains one extra test and the condition variable. The loop, if you look closely is equivalent to

for( ; index_to_advance < N-1 && !in_range(index_to_advance);++index_to_advance)

(removing the ++index_to_advance at the end), and the optimizer might have a better chance of unrolling that.

That being said, I don't think this explains the huge time difference, although it does explain why the recursive version is not much slower than the iterative one. Check the generated assembly to see what the compiler actually did.

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Are you sure the 'TCO' version is accurate? It never completed for me (~30 minutes). I haven't looked into it though –  sehe Jun 3 '12 at 1:54
    
@sehe: You are right, the transformation is incorrect, the first line has to be inside the loop (i.e. has to be applied to each iteration)... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 3 '12 at 1:57
    
+1 Great explanation. –  Oliver Jun 3 '12 at 20:01
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Just to add more detail to what David Rodriguez said:

With tail recursion optimization, the function becomes:

 void advance(int index_to_advance = 0) {
  top:
  _state[ index_to_advance ] += _delta[ index_to_advance ];
  if ( ! in_range(index_to_advance) ) {
    if (index_to_advance < N-1) {
      // restart index_to_advance
      _state[index_to_advance] = _lower[index_to_advance];

      // carry
      ++index_to_advance;
      goto top;
    }
  }
}

and this does indeed have the same performance as the recursive version on my system (g++ 4.6.3 -std=c++0x)

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+1 It's so strange to me that a label...goto would be more efficient (you can do things with label...goto that move between scope and make the compiler punt), but I can see why in this case. Thanks! –  Oliver Jun 3 '12 at 20:02
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