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I wanted to choose what data to put into which file depending on the index. However, I seem to be stuck with the following.

I have created the files using an array of file handles:

my @file_h;
my $file;
foreach $file (0..11)
{
    $file_h[$file]= new IT::File ">seq.$file.fastq";
}

$file= index;
print $file_h[$file] "$record_r1[0]$record_r1[1]$record_r1[2]$record_r1[3]\n";

However, I get an error for some reason in the last line. Help anyone....?

share|improve this question
    
This is an oddity of Perl's syntax, since filehandles weren't originally even variables, much less more complicated lvalues. – Mark Reed Jun 3 '12 at 2:26
    
What is the error? Also, could you contrive a complete, self contained example? (That would answer some immediate questions like, do you really mean IT::File [sic]? Do you mean index() or $index?) – pilcrow Jun 3 '12 at 21:18

That should simply be:

my @file_h;
for my $file (0..11) {
    open($file_h[$file], ">", "seq.$file.fastq")
       || die "cannot open seq.$file.fastq: $!";
}

# then later load up $some_index and then print 
print { $file_h[$some_index] } @record_r1[0..3], "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
ah...the bracket thingy, thanks – Erik Aronesty Jun 28 '13 at 13:53

You can always use the object-oriented syntax:

$file_h[$file]->print("$record_r1[0]$record_r1[1]$record_r1[2]$record_r1[3]\n");

Also, you can print out the array more simply:

$file_h[$file]->print(@record_r1[0..3],"\n");

Or like this, if those four elements are actually the whole thing:

$file_h[$file]->print("@record_r1\n");
share|improve this answer

Try assigning the $file_h[$file] to a temporary variable first:

my @file_h;
my $file;
my $current_file;

foreach $file (0..11)
{
    $file_h[$file]= new IT::File ">seq.$file.fastq";
}

$file= index;
$current_file = $file_h[$file];

print $current_file "$record_r1[0]$record_r1[1]$record_r1[2]$record_r1[3]\n";

As far as I remember, Perl doesn't recognize it as an output handle otherwise, complaining about invalid syntax.

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