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And by "same thing" I mean do these two operations basically do the same work, and it just boils down to which one is more convenient to call based on what you have to work with? (i.e. a list of delegates or a list of things to iterate over)? I've been searching MSDN, StackOverflow, and various random articles but I have yet to find a clear answer for this.

EDIT: I should have been clearer; I am asking if the two methods do the same thing because if they do not, I would like to understand which would be more efficient.

Example: I have a list of 500 key values. Currently I use a foreach loop that iterates through the list (serially) and performs work for each item. If I want to take advantage of multiple cores, should I simply use Parallel.ForEach instead? let's say for arguments's sake that I had an array of 500 delegates for those 500 tasks - would the net effect be any different calling Parallel.Invoke and giving it a list of 500 delegates?

Many thanks in advance!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Parallel.ForEach goes through the list of elements and can perform some task on the elements of the array.

eg.

Parallel.ForEach(val, (array) => Sum(array));

Parallel.Invoke can invoke many functions in parallel.

eg.

Parallel.Invoke(
() => doSum(array),
() => doAvg(ayyay),
() => doMedian(array));

As from example above you can see that they are essentially different in functionallity. One can Iterate through a List of elements and perform do parallel task on each element, other can invoke many tasks on single element in parallel.

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"Parallel.ForEach ... can perform some task on the elements of the array." So what if my task is to invoke a function? Any real difference vs Parallel.Invoke in terms of how the work gets done, and whether one will outperform the other? –  Brad Gagne Jun 3 '12 at 2:47
    
1. Parallel.ForEach(val, (array) => Sum(array)); is calling function Sum(), so yes it can invoke a function. 2. I think it just depends on what you need to do. If you are invoking a single function on list of elements than Parallel.ForEach seems like a good choice, but if you are invoking more then one function on List of elements or single element than Parallel.Invoke will work best. –  Mayank Jun 3 '12 at 2:57

Parallel.Invoke and Parallel.ForEach (when used to execute Actions) function the same, although yes one specifically wants the collection to be an Array. Consider the following sample:

List<Action> actionsList = new List<Action>
            {
                () => Console.WriteLine("0"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("1"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("2"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("3"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("4"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("5"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("6"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("7"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("8"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("9"),
            };

            Parallel.ForEach<Action>(actionsList, ( o => o() ));

            Console.WriteLine();

            Action[] actionsArray = new Action[]
            {
                () => Console.WriteLine("0"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("1"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("2"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("3"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("4"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("5"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("6"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("7"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("8"),
                () => Console.WriteLine("9"),
            };

            Parallel.Invoke(actionsArray);

            Console.ReadKey();

This code produces this output on one Run. It's output is generally in a different order every time.

0 5 1 6 2 7 3 8 4 9

0 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 3

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Thanks plukich. In my particular case I have some "fire-and-forget" work to be performed, so I am not concerned with return values or even what order the work is performed in. So I was purely curious with whether there was any difference/benefit to calling one or the other. –  Brad Gagne Jun 3 '12 at 2:41
    
In my experiences, they behave the same. This may be more effort than you want, but if you download the latest .NET Reflector and open mscorlib.dll, you can see the exact answer to your question by looking into the Parallel class in System.Threading.Tasks. That's what I would do. –  plukich Jun 3 '12 at 3:15

I'm trying to find a good way of phrasing it; but they are not the same thing.

The reason is, Invoke works on an Array of Action and ForEach works on a List (specifically an IEnumerable) of Action; Lists are significantly different to Arrays in mechanics although they expose the same sort of basic behaviour.

I can't say what the difference actually entails because I don't know, so please don't accept this an an answer (unless you really want too!) but I hope it jogs someones memory as to the mechanisms.

+1 for a good question too.

Edit; It just occurred to me that there is another answer too; Invoke can work on a dynamic list of Actions; but Foreach can work with a Generic IEnumerable of Actions and gives you the ability to use conditional logic, Action by Action; so you could test a condition before saying Action.Invoke() in each Foreach iteration.

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Thanks for the reply, Russ. I understand the difference in terms of method signatures, I was just wondering if internally they are both using the same approach to chew through the work. –  Brad Gagne Jun 3 '12 at 2:39
1  
In that case; no they aren't. ForEach gives you access to the Action before it's invoked; Invoke just does it. –  Russ C Jun 3 '12 at 2:44

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