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This is the JavaScript code generated by CoffeeScript's extends keyword. How the prototype chain gets setup?

var __hasProp = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty,
__extends = function(child, parent) { 
    for (var key in parent) { 
        if (__hasProp.call(parent, key)) child[key] = parent[key]; 
    } 
    function ctor() { this.constructor = child; } 
    ctor.prototype = parent.prototype; 
    child.prototype = new ctor; 
    child.__super__ = parent.prototype; 
    return child; 
};
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Which part is giving you trouble? –  Juan Mendes Jun 3 '12 at 2:08
    
do not understand this line: ctor.prototype = parent.prototype; –  powerboy Jun 3 '12 at 2:17
    
My blog post details that. ctor is called a surrogate constructor. It's a separate constructor that you copy the prototype of the parent to. It sets up the prototype chain child.prototype = new ctor without having to call the parent's constructor just for setting up inheritance. The more known (but problematic) way of setting inheritance is by doing child.prototype = new parent. Again, my blog post goes into details of what are the problems with that –  Juan Mendes Jun 3 '12 at 2:20
    
I read your blog post. Very thorough explanation. The key thing is understanding "surrogate constructor". Thanks! –  powerboy Jun 3 '12 at 2:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted
var __hasProp = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty,
__extends = function(child, parent) {
    // Copy "static" attributes from the parent constructor to the child constructor
    for (var key in parent) { 
        if (__hasProp.call(parent, key)) child[key] = parent[key]; 
    } 
    // This is the surrogate constructor, used so you don't need
    // to instantiate an instance of the parent just to setup the prototype chain
    // the statement in the surrogate constructor properly attaches
    // the constructor property to object
    function ctor() { this.constructor = child; }
    // Attach the parent's prototype to the surrogate constructor
    ctor.prototype = parent.prototype; 
    // This is setting up the chain, attaching an instance of a constructor whose
    // prototype is set to the parent to the prototype property of the child
    // In naive implementations, this would be child.prototype = new parent();
    child.prototype = new ctor; 
    // Allows access to the parent from user code, and used by the `super` keyword
    child.__super__ = parent.prototype; 
    return child; 
};

See http://js-bits.blogspot.com/2010/08/javascript-inheritance-done-right.html (my own blog post)

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I know it wasn't the part the OP was interested in, but do you know why this code uses __hasProp like that? I don't understand how that helps compared to saying if (parent.hasOwnProperty(key))... –  nnnnnn Jun 3 '12 at 2:53
3  
It's so it still works even if a property parent.hasOwnProperty has been overwritten on the parent. Sometimes written as {}.hasOwnProperty.call(parent, key) –  Juan Mendes Jun 3 '12 at 3:30
    
OK, cool. Thanks. –  nnnnnn Jun 3 '12 at 9:34

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