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I just tried to allocate 10 byte for c string and printed without assigning anything. and I printed over the size of cstring. But result was quite different than I thought. Since malloc only allocates raw memory, I thought it would print any junk values. And since I tried to print over the size of c string, I thought the behavior should be undefined. But they all printed null character I think Here is my code.

int main(void)
{
    int i;
    char * c = (char *)malloc(10);
    for(i=0; i<20; ++i)
    {
        printf("%c.\n", *(c+i));
    }
    return 0;
}

And I saw 20 lines of '.' Could anyone explain this? I ran this under Linux, used gcc the latest version Thank you

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1  
A premise of "Why does invoking undefined behavior work here?" is flawed. Undefined behavior means that anything could happen (including some definition of "working"). – jamesdlin Jun 3 '12 at 3:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It hasn't been initialized yet. It needs to be set to a value before you can see anything useful. It simply printed what was already at that memory address (unless a few compiler options are set), which is most likely just 0.

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okay, but then, what should happen when you try to print beyond the c string size??? – in His Steps Jun 3 '12 at 2:41
    
I don't exactly know, but won't that throw an EXC_BAD_ACCESS (Bus error)? – C0deH4cker Jun 3 '12 at 2:42
    
hmm.. it did not throw error, and I had -ansi -std=c89 flag, so it should have compiled with standard c89 – in His Steps Jun 3 '12 at 2:43
1  
@C0deH4cker: It won't segv unless you access memory not owned by your process. Memory is handed out with a minimum granularity of 4k. With huge pages the granularity for some allocations can be multiple megabytes. The heap sub-allocates whatever memory it gets from the system. So if you just allocate 10 bytes and then print 11, chances are you wont go over a 4k boundary, and if you do, you probably just roll into the next one, which is probably within your process too. I have only BUS err when you access past the boundaries of a mmap'd file, or it gets deleted underneath you. – johnnycrash Jun 3 '12 at 4:14
1  
@inHisSteps: "I guess it's undefined... I just wanted to make sure what should happen" -- in the presence of undefined behavior, there is no should. – Keith Thompson Jun 3 '12 at 5:10

Whenever the Linux kernel maps a "fresh" memory page into user space to your process, it fills this page with zeros so you cannot find any residues of data that another process might have left in those memory addresses, because this memory could have belonged to another process (and also another user) with secret data e.g. passwords, keys, etc. (In case you are interested, the kernel calls the function unsigned long get_zeroed_page(gfp_t gfp_mask); defined in linux/gfp.h)

As long as this page is associated with your process, no effort is made to fill the page with zeros again, so the following code should still print out the values you put there before even though you freed the memory:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>


int main(){
    char* test1 = malloc(100);
    int i;
    for(i=0; i<5; i++){
        test1[i] = i+'A';
    }
    free(test1);
    char* test2 = malloc(100);
    for(i=0; i<5; i++){
        printf("%c.\n",test2[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

This should give you the following output (no guarantee though):

$ ./a.out 
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
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I see. Thank you! – in His Steps Jun 3 '12 at 21:26

Behavior should still be undefined if you are reading over an array. Your result just means that the memory had '\0' stored in it before it was allocated. Use calloc() to initialise an array to zeros.

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No, the memory location didn't have '.'. The memory location had '\0' stored there. the '.' comes from his printf format string "%c.\n". – C0deH4cker Jun 3 '12 at 2:48

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