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I would appreciate a solution to the following problem: I have 2 types of variables

class Type1Str : public string
{
public:
  Type1Str(const string & str) : string(str) {}
};

class Type2Str : public string
{
public:
  Type2Str(const string & str) : string(str) {}
};

I would like to enjoy all the benefits of a string, but prevent cross assignments:

Type1Str t1; 
Type2Str t2;
t1 = t2;                           // <= should not be allowed
Type2Str t2_1(t1);                 // <= should not be allowed
Type2Str t2_2("a string");         // <= should be allowed

How can I do this?

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is this homework? –  Jeremy Friesner Jun 3 '12 at 6:00
    
unfortunately not :) .. would appreciate help anyway. –  OSH Jun 3 '12 at 6:05
1  
This isn't really an answer, but... why are you deriving publicly from std::string? Private inheritance I can understand, but why public? –  Nicol Bolas Jun 3 '12 at 6:09
    
@Nicol Bolas I would like to expose the public methods of string. –  OSH Jun 3 '12 at 6:17
1  
It's generally considered a bad idea to derive from the STL containers. You should use containment instead. That is: class Type1String { string s; public: ...}. –  Andrew Tomazos Jun 3 '12 at 6:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unfortunately the OP presented code that didn't compile.

Here's the original code corrected in the most natural way so that it compiles:

class Type1Str : public string
{
public:
    Type1Str() {}
    Type1Str(const string & str) : string(str) {}
};

class Type2Str : public string
{
public:
    Type2Str() {}
    Type2Str(const string & str) : string(str) {}
};

Assuming that the above was what was meant, all that's needed to prevent cross assignment is to make the converting constructor explicit.

#include <string>
using std::string;

class Type1Str : public string
{
public:
    Type1Str() {}
    explicit Type1Str(const string & str) : string(str) {}
};

class Type2Str : public string
{
public:
    Type2Str() {}
    explicit Type2Str(const string & str) : string(str) {}
};

int main()
{
    Type1Str t1; 
    Type2Str t2;

    t1 = t2;            // A. !Invalid, involves an implicit conversion.
    Type2Str t2_2(t1);  // B. Still allowed, here the conversion is explicit.
}

In the line marked B the conversion that's invoked is not an implicit conversion of the actual argument, but the Type2Str's explicit conversion constructor. The actual argument t1 matches the formal argument of that constructor directly because t2 is a std::string. The OP wants to prevent also line B.

One simple way is then to make the conversion even more explicit, namely, to name it.

I.e., to either introduce a carrier type for the formal argument, or to introduce an extra dummy conversion name argument, or to replace the public conversion constructor with a public factory function. The factory function is simplest and is as of 2012 cost free re efficiency, but it has a cost in maintenance: a derived class must reimplement it in order to offer that functionality. Of the other two solutions mentioned here, the extra dummy name argument is the easiest to implement and the least code:

#include <string>
using std::string;

namespace from { enum StdString { stdString }; };

class Type1Str : public string
{
public:
    Type1Str() {}
    Type1Str( from::StdString, const string & str) : string(str) {}
};

class Type2Str : public string
{
public:
    Type2Str() {}
    Type2Str( from::StdString, const string & str) : string(str) {}
};

int main()
{
    Type1Str t1; 
    Type2Str t2;
    Type2Str t3( from::stdString, t1 ); // OK.

    t1 = t2;            // A. !Invalid, no conversion possible.
    Type2Str t2_2(t1);  // B. !Invalid, no conversion possible.
}

So, what's wrong with instead just declaring private constructors and assignment operators for all the the types that one wants to prohibit direct copying from?

Well, besides being brittle, for n types that amounts to O(n2) declarations. So it's generally not a good idea. As I'm writing this, however, the OP has selected an answer with that approach as “the solution”. Just be warned: it’ really not a good idea, in general.

share|improve this answer
    
ok, I understand the arguments. I agree this solution is better. Thanks. –  OSH Jun 3 '12 at 7:26
    
btw - in the 2'nd class definition you left the 'explicit'. Does that serve a purpose, or is it a typo? –  OSH Jun 3 '12 at 8:00
    
Sorry, I just didn't see it. Probably removed as your read this. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 3 '12 at 8:05

This should do the trick:

#include <string>

using namespace std;

class Type2Str;

class Type1Str : public string
{
public:
    Type1Str() {}
    Type1Str(const std::string & str) : std::string(str) {}

private:
    Type1Str(const Type2Str &);  // deliberately private and unimplemented
    Type1Str & operator = (const Type2Str &);  // deliberately private and unimplemented
};

class Type2Str : public string
{
public:
    Type2Str() {}
    Type2Str(const std::string & str) : std::string(str) {}

private:
    Type2Str(const Type1Str &);  // deliberately private and unimplemented
    Type2Str & operator = (const Type1Str &);  // deliberately private and unimplemented
};

int main(int, char **)
{
   Type1Str t1;
   Type2Str t2;
   t1 = t2;                           // <= should not be allowed
   Type2Str t1_2(t1);                 // <= should not be allowed
   Type2Str t2_2("a string");         // <= should be allowed
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! your solution works. –  OSH Jun 3 '12 at 6:26
    
@iammilind This appears to be another case where visual studio is just too nice. You are right about not having to do anything to solve this in gcc. However, the same code DOES compile in VS. I should have mentioned in the question I am using VS. Thanks for your comment and answer. –  OSH Jun 3 '12 at 6:44
    
@OSH, no actually my perception was wrong. I have deleted my answer and the above comment. And upvoting this post. –  iammilind Jun 3 '12 at 6:49
    
For n types this involves O( n ² ) constructor and assignment op declarations. That's impractical as a general solution. It's verbose even for just the two types in the OP's example. And it's brittle even for the case of just two or three types, as evidenced by the OP's typo of the constructor name in the original code. That means, easy to get wrong, e.g. by a typo. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 3 '12 at 7:07

Just put constructor into private/protected part of the declaration:

class Type1Str : public string
{
    Type1Str(const class Type2Str&); // use forward declaration for class Type2Str
public:
    Type1Str(const string & str) : string(str) {}
};

class Type2Str : public string
{
    Type2Str(const Type1Str&); // this does not allow 'Type2Str t2_2(t1);'
public:
    Type2Str(const string & str) : string(str) {}
};
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