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I am building an application and a lot of my view show up only once. So I am making this:

+(listNewController *) singleton
{
    return _singleton;
}

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    _singleton = self;

Somewhere in

- (void)viewDidUnload
{
    _singleton = nil;

Now, not only I got a nice reference to my single ViewController I can do some code safeguard to ensure that viewDidLoad is called only if _singleton == nil.

But most people put references to their ViewController on the application delegate instead of singleton.

Why?

What's the plus and minus anyway?

share|improve this question
2  
if your views show up only once, you don't need the singleton--just create the single instance and dispose it when you're done with it... or did I miss something? – nielsbot Jun 3 '12 at 8:13
up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, I am not sure that most people put references in the application delegate. Most beginners certainly do, because the app delegate is right there when you create a project, and that is the only object accessible from anywhere in the code without having to do anything else.

The minuses are mainly that this is not best practice to just put everything in there just because it's convenient. The App Delegate is just that, a delegate object that performs actions related to the lifecycle of an application, not a container for global variables. So it violates the concept of encapsulation to just store things in the delegate that are not in relation with the role of that delegate.

In your case, you're using the singleton to return the single instance of a view controller. I am not sure that this is the best way to do it either. What works nice in your specific scenario is not reusable in the case of multiple view controllers. Since this kind of classes is meant to be instantiated multiple times, it feels out of place to define it as a singleton, if that makes sense.

In my opinion, it would be better if you created a separate singleton class (like MyViewControllersSingleton), in which you would reference your different unique controllers as properties. The singleton object could be called from anywhere the same way:

[MyViewControllersSingleton sharedInstance].listNewController;

For most apps, I usually have most of my global variables and pointers to unique view controllers in one singleton that I call AppSingleton. But you could imagine creating multiple singletons, if you want a better separation of concerns.

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure what problem the asker is trying to solve, but just posting two possible methods I use to make singletons:

Method 1, use +load:

@class MyClass

static MyClass * __instance = nil ;

+(void)load
{
    @autoreleasepool {
        __instance = [ [ self alloc ] init ] ;  // (use your designated initializer)
    }
}

+(MyClass*)sharedInstance
{
    return __instance ;
}

@end

Method 2, lazy initialization:

@implementation MyClass

+(MyClass*)sharedInstance
{
    @synchronized( self )
    {
        if ( !__instance )
        {
            __instance = [ [ self alloc ] init ] ;  // (use your designated initializer)
        }

        return __instance ;
    }
}

@end

for view controller case, try this:

@implementation MyViewController 

static MyViewController * __instance = nil ;

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibName bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundle
{
    @synchronized( [ self class ] )
    {
        self = __instance ;
        if ( !self )
        {
            self = [ super initWithNibName:nibName bundle:nibBundle ] ;
            __instance = self ;
        }
    }

    // ...finish init as normal here

    return self ;
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
You can't do that with ViewControler. View controller is loaded at a specific time and not arbitrarily. – Jim Thio Jun 3 '12 at 8:20
1  
ok, why do you need to enforce there being a single instance of your view controller? couldn't you just load it the one time you need it using the normal mechanism? seems simpler. – nielsbot Jun 3 '12 at 8:21
    
Just in case I make mistakes latter. The mother of all restrictions don't you think? – Jim Thio Jun 3 '12 at 8:25
    
like what kind of mistakes? :) Anyway, i amended my answer – nielsbot Jun 3 '12 at 8:28
    
Another issue is initWithNibName is often never called. Anyway thanks. i did it in viewdidload though. – Jim Thio Jun 3 '12 at 10:19

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