Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

when I do:

http://localhost:3000/signout

it says:

No route matches [GET] "/signout"

This is because in my routes config file I have:

match '/signout', to: 'sessions#destroy', via: :delete

so my question is whether its possible to send a "delete" request via the URL, so instead of pressing a link:

<%= link_to "Sign out", signout_path, :method => :delete %>

I can mimic the action via URL.

share|improve this question
    
If you want to be able to just go to /signout you'll need to make that route accessible via get as well as delete. –  Frederick Cheung Jun 3 '12 at 13:06
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not really. Although DELETE is part of the HTTP spec almost all web browsers only know how to make GET and POST requestes. When you click a link_to with the :delete method Rails actually creates a form on the fly and 'POSTs' it back to the server. Have a look at the source code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you point your browser to http://localhost:3000/signout, that will generate a GET request, which doesn't match any routes.

If you click the link generated by <%= link_to "Sign out", signout_path, :method => :delete %> instead, then you'll get the DELETE request as you want. In other words, your code works.

If you're not using other methods on this route, consider refactoring as:

delete '/signout', to: 'sessions#destroy'

EDIT: Keep in mind that, for Rails, a DELETE request is just a POST request, with a parameter _method set to 'delete'.

share|improve this answer
add comment
match ':controller(/:action(/:id))(.:format)'

make sure to deactivate this in router whic is in last and try once.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry I ment URL, not URI –  Saad Jun 3 '12 at 10:15
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.