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InputStreamReader inp= new InputStreamReader(System.in);
do  
{  
  BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(inp);  
  System.out.println("Enter Roll number : ");  
  int rno= Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());   

  System.out.println("Enter name: ");  
  String name= br.readLine();

  System.out.println("Continue y/n: ");  
  char ans=(char)br.read();  
} while(ans=='y');    

How can I write BufferedReader outside the loop? If I use it outside, it is showing the following exception:

java.lang.numberformatexception for input string at            
    java.lang.Integer.parseInt(Integer.java:468)

Is there any mechanism to flush the BufferedReader? What can be done??

share|improve this question
    
I've answered a similar question over here: stackoverflow.com/questions/7635917/… – aioobe Jun 3 '12 at 7:20

It is not 'nice' but worked for me - I added br.readLine():

public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException {
    BufferedReader br = null;
    try {
        InputStreamReader inp = new InputStreamReader(System.in);
        br = new BufferedReader(inp);
        char ans;
        do {
            System.out.println("Enter Roll number : ");
            int rno = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());

            System.out.println("Enter name: ");
            String name = br.readLine();

            System.out.println("Continue y/n: ");
            ans = (char) br.read();
            br.readLine();
        } while (ans == 'y');
    } finally {
        if (br != null) {
            br.close();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Ridhi Jain To explain why this is necessary, the read() reads the 'y', but there is still a newline in the buffer, because you had to type a newline after the 'y' to get the program to accept it. readLine() processes the newline so that the next parseInt() doesn't try to parse it. – EJP Jun 6 '12 at 1:02

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