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I've built a simple utility in C# that uses Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo objects to export a database schema. This has been working great until I added a full text index.

When it exports the SQL for creating a full text index it does not include the columns that are defined in the index. For example, suppose I have a table named "Recipes" with 2 columns included in the FT index named "RecipeName" "Description". Dumping the schema using my utility produces the following SQL:

CREATE FULLTEXT INDEX ON [dbo].[Recipes]
KEY INDEX [PK_Recipes]ON ([ft], FILEGROUP [PRIMARY])
WITH (CHANGE_TRACKING = AUTO, STOPLIST = SYSTEM)

What I expect to be dumped is this (notice the columns):

CREATE FULLTEXT INDEX ON [dbo].[Recipes](
    [Description] LANGUAGE [English], 
    [RecipeName] LANGUAGE [English]
)
KEY INDEX [PK_Recipes]ON ([ft], FILEGROUP [PRIMARY])
WITH (CHANGE_TRACKING = AUTO, STOPLIST = SYSTEM)

Here's the C# that generates the schema from a database file:

static void GenerateScript(string sourceDbPath, string destinationScriptPath)
{
    try
    {
        string           connString = string.Format(@"Data Source=.;AttachDbFilename={0};Integrated Security=True;User Instance=True", sourceDbPath);
        SqlConnection       sqlConn = new SqlConnection(connString);
        ServerConnection serverConn = new ServerConnection(sqlConn);
        Server               server = new Server(serverConn);            
        Database           database = server.Databases[sourceDbPath];
        Transfer           transfer = new Transfer(database);
        ScriptingOptions    options = new ScriptingOptions();

        options.AppendToFile = false;       // Overwrite file
        options.ClusteredIndexes = true;
        options.Indexes = true;
        options.DriAll = true;
        options.Triggers = true;
        options.Bindings = true;
        options.Default = true;
        options.IncludeDatabaseContext = false;
        options.IncludeHeaders = true;
        options.FullTextIndexes = true;

        options.SchemaQualify = true;
        options.SchemaQualifyForeignKeysReferences = true;
        options.ScriptSchema = true;
        options.ScriptData = false;
        options.ScriptDrops = false;

        options.FileName = destinationScriptPath;
        transfer.Options = options;
        transfer.CopyAllFullTextCatalogs = true;
        transfer.CopyAllFullTextStopLists = true;
        transfer.CopyAllTables = true;

        transfer.ScriptTransfer();
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
        Environment.Exit(-1);
    }
}

Can anyone spot what I'm missing?

share|improve this question
    
Possible you have to script the columns separately? You shouldn't have to, though. technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Aaron Bertrand Jun 3 '12 at 11:17
    
Hey, did you end up open-sourcing your code anywhere? I'm interested in doing something similar. – Gili Aug 13 '15 at 21:21
    
No, sorry. I can't open source this bit of code. – BitsEvolved Aug 14 '15 at 2:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I was unable to find a combination of scripting options that would include the columns in the full text index create statement.

So instead I queried the database for the full text index information by executing the sp_help_fulltext_tables and sp_help_fulltext_columns stored procs. This allowed me to construct the statements by hand.

Not ideal but it works.

share|improve this answer

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